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Creators/Authors contains: "Bernardi, Marco"

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  1. Abstract

    Charge transport in organic molecular crystals (OMCs) is conventionally categorized into two limiting regimes − band transport, characterized by weak electron-phonon (e-ph) interactions, and charge hopping due to localized polarons formed by strong e-ph interactions. However, between these two limiting cases there is a less well understood intermediate regime where polarons are present but transport does not occur via hopping. Here we show a many-body first-principles approach that can accurately predict the carrier mobility in this intermediate regime and shed light on its microscopic origin. Our approach combines a finite-temperature cumulant method to describe strong e-ph interactions with Green-Kubo transport calculations. We apply this parameter-free framework to naphthalene crystal, demonstrating electron mobility predictions within a factor of 1.5−2 of experiment between 100 and 300 K. Our analysis reveals the formation of a broad polaron satellite peak in the electron spectral function and the failure of the Boltzmann equation in the intermediate regime.

  2. Predicting the electrical properties of organic molecular crystals (OMCs) is challenging due to their complex crystal structures and electron-phonon (e-ph) interactions. Charge transport in OMCs is conventionally categorized into two limiting regimes − band transport, characterized by weak e-ph interactions, and charge hopping due to localized polarons formed by strong e-ph interactions. However, between these two limiting cases there is a less well understood intermediate regime where polarons are present but transport does not occur via hopping. Here we show a many-body first-principles approach that can accurately predict the carrier mobility in OMCs in the intermediate regime and shed light on its microscopic origin. Our approach combines a finite-temperature cumulant method to describe strong e-ph interactions with Green-Kubo transport calculations. We apply this parameter-free framework to naphthalene crystal, demonstrating electron mobility predictions within a factor of 1.5−2 of experiment between 100−300 K. Our analysis reveals that electrons couple strongly with both inter- and intramolecular phonons in the intermediate regime, as evidenced by the formation of a broad polaron satellite peak in the electron spectral function and the failure of the Boltzmann equation. Our study advances quantitative modeling of charge transport in complex organic crystals.
  3. Semiconductors with O(meV) band gaps have been shown to be promising targets to search for sub-MeV mass dark matter (DM). In this paper we focus on a class of materials where such narrow band gaps arise naturally as a consequence of spin-orbit coupling (SOC). Specifically, we are interested in computing DM-electron scattering and absorption rates in these materials using state- of-the-art density functional theory (DFT) techniques. To do this, we extend the DM interaction rate calculation to include SOC effects which necessitates a generalization to spin-dependent wave functions. We apply our new formalism to calculate limits for several DM benchmark models using an example ZrTe5 target and show that the inclusion of SOC can substantially alter projected constraints.
  4. Abstract

    Point defects in hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) have attracted growing attention as bright single-photon emitters. However, understanding of their atomic structure and radiative properties remains incomplete. Here we study the excited states and radiative lifetimes of over 20 native defects and carbon or oxygen impurities in hBN using ab initio density functional theory and GW plus Bethe-Salpeter equation calculations, generating a large data set of their emission energy, polarization and lifetime. We find a wide variability across quantum emitters, with exciton energies ranging from 0.3 to 4 eV and radiative lifetimes from ns to ms for different defect structures. Through a Bayesian statistical analysis, we identify various high-likelihood charge-neutral defect emitters, among which the native VNNBdefect is predicted to possess emission energy and radiative lifetime in agreement with experiments. Our work advances the microscopic understanding of hBN single-photon emitters and introduces a computational framework to characterize and identify quantum emitters in 2D materials.

  5. Abstract

    The discovery and development of ultra-wide bandgap (UWBG) semiconductors is crucial to accelerate the adoption of renewable power sources. This necessitates an UWBG semiconductor that exhibits robust doping with high carrier mobility over a wide range of carrier concentrations. Here we demonstrate that epitaxial thin films of the perovskite oxide NdxSr1xSnO3(SSO) do exactly this. Nd is used as a donor to successfully modulate the carrier concentration over nearly two orders of magnitude, from 3.7 × 1018 cm−3to 2.0 × 1020 cm−3. Despite being grown on lattice-mismatched substrates and thus having relatively high structural disorder, SSO films exhibited the highest room-temperature mobility, ~70 cm2 V−1 s−1, among all known UWBG semiconductors in the range of carrier concentrations studied. The phonon-limited mobility is calculated from first principles and supplemented with a model to treat ionized impurity and Kondo scattering. This produces excellent agreement with experiment over a wide range of temperatures and carrier concentrations, and predicts the room-temperature phonon-limited mobility to be 76–99 cm2 V−1 s−1depending on carrier concentration. This work establishes a perovskite oxide as an emerging UWBG semiconductor candidate with potential for applications in power electronics.