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Creators/Authors contains: "Bernstein, D."

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  1. Abstract

    At altitudes below about 600 km, satellite drag is one of the most important and variable forces acting on a satellite. Neutral mass density predictions in the upper atmosphere are therefore critical for (a) designing satellites; (b) performing adjustments to stay in an intended orbit; and (c) collision avoidance maneuver planning. Density predictions have a great deal of uncertainty, including model biases and model misrepresentation of the atmospheric response to energy input. These may stem from inaccurate approximations of terms in the Navier‐Stokes equations, unmodeled physics, incorrect boundary conditions, or incorrect parameterizations. Two commonly parameterized source terms are the thermal conduction and eddy diffusion. Both are critical components in the transfer of the heat in the thermosphere. Determining how well the major constituents (N2, O2, and O) are as heat conductors will have effects on the temperature and mass density changes from a heat source. This work shows the effectiveness of using the retrospective cost model refinement (RCMR) technique at removing model bias caused by different sources within the Global Ionosphere Thermosphere Model. Numerical experiments, Challenging Minisatellite Payload and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment data during real events are used to show that RCMR can compensate for model bias causedmore »by both inaccurate parameterizations and drivers. RCMR is used to show that eliminating model bias before a storm allows for more accurate predictions throughout the storm.

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  2. Identification of self excited systems
  3. We examine problem scoping in our interdisciplinary curriculum where students build biomimetic robots. Biomimicry is a context for learning biology, computational thinking, and engineering design. In the solution space, students narrow the scope of their robot designs, informed by animal structure-function relationships. In the challenge space, they narrow the scope of real-world disasters by modeling them in the classroom. This dual problem scoping enables students to be active participants shaping the content of their learning.
  4. Gresalfi, M. ; Horn, I. S. (Ed.)
    There is broad belief that preparing all students in preK-12 for a future in STEM involves integrating computing and computational thinking (CT) tools and practices. Through creating and examining rich “STEM+CT” learning environments that integrate STEM and CT, researchers are defining what CT means in STEM disciplinary settings. This interactive session brings together a diverse spectrum of leading STEM researchers to share how they operationalize CT, what integrated CT and STEM learning looks like in their curriculum, and how this learning is measured. It will serve as a rich opportunity for discussion to help advance the state of the field of STEM and CT integration.
  5. Gresalfi, M. ; Horn, I. S. (Ed.)
    There is broad belief that preparing all students in preK-12 for a future in STEM involves integrating computing and computational thinking (CT) tools and practices. Through creating and examining rich “STEM+CT” learning environments that integrate STEM and CT, researchers are defining what CT means in STEM disciplinary settings. This interactive session brings together a diverse spectrum of leading STEM researchers to share how they operationalize CT, what integrated CT and STEM learning looks like in their curriculum, and how this learning is measured. It will serve as a rich opportunity for discussion to help advance the state of the field of STEM and CT integration.