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  1. Ongoing environmental changes alter how natural selection shapes animal migration. Understanding how these changes play out theoretically can be done using evolutionary game theoretic (EGT) approaches, such as looking for evolutionarily stable strategies. Here, we first describe historical patterns of how EGT models have explored different drivers of migration. We find that there are substantial gaps in both the taxa (mammals, amphibians, reptiles, insects) and mechanisms (mutualism, interspecific competition) included in past EGT models of migration. Although enemy interactions, including parasites, are increasingly considered in models of animal migration, they remain the least studied of factors for migration considered to date. Furthermore, few papers look at changes in migration in response to perturbations (e.g. climate change, new species interactions). To address this gap, we present a new EGT model to understand how infection with a novel parasite changes host migration. We find three possible outcomes when migrants encounter novel parasites: maintenance of migration (despite the added infection cost), loss of migration (evolutionary shift to residency) or population collapse, depending on the risk and cost of getting infected, and the cost currency. Our work demonstrates how emerging infection can alter animal behaviour such as migration. This article is part of the theme issue ‘Half a century of evolutionary games: a synthesis of theory, application and future directions’. 
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  2. null (Ed.)
    ABSTRACT There is nothing like a pandemic to get the world thinking about how infectious diseases affect individual behavior. In this respect, sick animals can behave in ways that are dramatically different from healthy animals: altered social interactions and changes to patterns of eating and drinking are all hallmarks of sickness. As a result, behavioral changes associated with inflammatory responses (i.e. sickness behaviors) have important implications for disease spread by affecting contacts with others and with common resources, including water and/or sleeping sites. In this Review, we summarize the behavioral modifications, including changes to thermoregulatory behaviors, known to occur in vertebrates during infection, with an emphasis on non-mammalian taxa, which have historically received less attention. We then outline and discuss our current understanding of the changes in physiology associated with the production of these behaviors and highlight areas where more research is needed, including an exploration of individual and sex differences in the acute phase response and a greater understanding of the ecophysiological implications of sickness behaviors for disease at the population level. 
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  3. Abstract

    Pathogen and parasite infections are increasingly recognized as powerful drivers of animal movement, including migration. Yet, infection‐related migration benefits can result from a combination of environmental and/or social conditions, which can be difficult to disentangle.

    Here, we focus on two infection‐related mechanisms that can favour migration: moving to escape versus recover from infection. By directly comparing the evolution of migration in response to each mechanism, we can evaluate the likely importance of changing abiotic conditions (linked to migratory recovery) with changing social conditions (linked to migratory escape) in terms of infection‐driven migration.

    We built a mathematical model and analysed it using numerically simulated adaptive dynamics to determine when migration should evolve for each migratory recovery and social migratory escape.

    We found that a higher fraction of the population migrated under migratory recovery than under social migratory escape. We also found that two distinct migratory strategies (e.g. some individuals always migrate and others only occasionally migrate) sometimes coexisted within populations with social migratory escape, but never with migratory recovery.

    Our results suggest that migratory recovery is more likely to promote the evolution of migratory behaviour, rather than escape from infected conspecifics (social migratory escape).

     
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  4. Abstract

    Migration can allow individuals to escape parasite infection, which can lead to a lower infection probability (prevalence) in a population and/or fewer parasites per individual (intensity). Because individuals with more parasites often have lower survival and/or fecundity, infection intensity shapes the life‐history trade‐offs determining when migration is favored as a strategy to escape infection. Yet, most theory relies on susceptible‐infected (SI) modeling frameworks, defining individuals as either healthy or infected, ignoring details of infection intensity. Here, we develop a novel modeling approach that captures infection intensity as a spectrum, and ask under what conditions migration evolves as function of how infection intensity changes over time. We show that relative timescales of migration and infection accumulation determine when migration is favored. We also find that population‐level heterogeneity in infection intensity can lead to partial migration, where less‐infected individuals migrate while more infected individuals remain resident. Our model is one of the first to consider how infection intensity can lead to migration. Our results frame migratory escape in light of infection intensity rather than prevalence, thus demonstrating that decreased infection intensity should be considered a benefit of migration, alongside other typical drivers of migration.

     
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  5. Abstract

    Most studies on the evolution of migration focus on food, mates and/or climate as factors influencing these movements, whereas negative species interactions such as predators, parasites and pathogens are often ignored. Although infection and its associated costs clearly have the potential to influence migration, thoroughly studying these interactions is challenging without a solid theoretical framework from which to develop testable predictions in natural systems.

    Here, we aim to understand when parasites favour the evolution of migration.

    We develop a general model which enables us to explore a broad range of biological conditions and to capture population and infection dynamics over both ecological and evolutionary time‐scales.

    We show that when migration evolves depends on whether the costs of migration and infection are paid in reduced fecundity or survival. Also important are the parasite transmission mode and spatiotemporal dynamics of infection and recovery (if it occurs). Finally, we find that partial migration (where only a fraction of the population migrates) can evolve but only when parasite transmission is density‐dependent.

    Our results highlight the critical, if overlooked, role of parasites in shaping long‐distance movement patterns, and suggest that infection should be considered alongside more traditional drivers of migration in both empirical and theoretical studies.

     
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