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  1. We present the results of millimetre-wave spectroscopic observations and spectral surveys of the following short-period comets: 21P/Giacobini-Zinner in September 2018, 41P/Tuttle-Giacobini-Kresák in April 2017, and 64P/Swift-Gehrels and 38P/Stephan-Oterma in December 2018, carried out with the Institut de RadioAstronomie Millimétrique (IRAM) 30-m radio telescope at wavelengths between 1 and 3 mm. Comet 21P was also observed in November 1998 with the IRAM 30-m, James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, and the Caltech submillimeter Observatory radio telescopes at wavelengths from 0.8 to 3 mm. The abundances of the following molecules have been determined in those comets: HCN, CH 3 OH, CS, H 2 CO, CH 3 CN, and H 2 S in comet 21P; HCN and CH 3 OH in 41P; HCN, CH 3 OH, and CS in 64P; and CH 3 OH in 38P. The last three comets, classified as carbon-chain typical from visible spectro-photometry, are relatively rich in methanol (3.5–5% relative to water). On the other hand, comet 21P, classified as carbon-chain depleted, shows abundances relative to water which are low for methanol (1.7%), very low for H 2 S (0.1%), and also relatively low for H 2 CO (0.16%) and CO (<2.5%). Observations of comet 21P do not show any changemore »in activity and composition between the 1998 and 2018 perihelions. Sensitive upper limits on the abundances of other molecules such as CO, HNCO, HNC, or SO are also reported for these comets.« less
  2. Free, publicly-accessible full text available June 1, 2023
  3. Inertial confinement fusion approaches involve the creation of high-energy-density states through compression. High gain scenarios may be enabled by the beneficial heating from fast electrons produced with an intense laser and by energy containment with a high-strength magnetic field. Here, we report experimental measurements from a configuration integrating a magnetized, imploded cylindrical plasma and intense laser-driven electrons as well as multi-stage simulations that show fast electrons transport pathways at different times during the implosion and quantify their energy deposition contribution. The experiment consisted of a CH foam cylinder, inside an external coaxial magnetic field of 5 T, that was imploded using 36 OMEGA laser beams. Two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic modelling predicts the CH density reaches 9.0   g cm − 3 , the temperature reaches 920 eV and the external B-field is amplified at maximum compression to 580 T. At pre-determined times during the compression, the intense OMEGA EP laser irradiated one end of the cylinder to accelerate relativistic electrons into the dense imploded plasma providing additional heating. The relativistic electron beam generation was simulated using a 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) code. Finally, three-dimensional hybrid-PIC simulations calculated the electron propagation and energy deposition inside the target and revealed the roles the compressed and self-generated B-fieldsmore »play in transport. During a time window before the maximum compression time, the self-generated B-field on the compression front confines the injected electrons inside the target, increasing the temperature through Joule heating. For a stronger B-field seed of 20 T, the electrons are predicted to be guided into the compressed target and provide additional collisional heating. This article is part of a discussion meeting issue ‘Prospects for high gain inertial fusion energy (part 2)’.« less
  4. Abstract Quantum chromodynamics, the theory of the strong force, describes interactions of coloured quarks and gluons and the formation of hadronic matter. Conventional hadronic matter consists of baryons and mesons made of three quarks and quark-antiquark pairs, respectively. Particles with an alternative quark content are known as exotic states. Here a study is reported of an exotic narrow state in the D 0 D 0 π + mass spectrum just below the D *+ D 0 mass threshold produced in proton-proton collisions collected with the LHCb detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The state is consistent with the ground isoscalar $${{{{{{\rm{T}}}}}}}_{{{{{{\rm{c}}}}}}{{{{{\rm{c}}}}}}}^{+}$$ T c c + tetraquark with a quark content of $${{{{{\rm{c}}}}}}{{{{{\rm{c}}}}}}\overline{{{{{{\rm{u}}}}}}}\overline{{{{{{\rm{d}}}}}}}$$ c c u ¯ d ¯ and spin-parity quantum numbers J P  = 1 + . Study of the DD mass spectra disfavours interpretation of the resonance as the isovector state. The decay structure via intermediate off-shell D *+ mesons is consistent with the observed D 0 π + mass distribution. To analyse the mass of the resonance and its coupling to the D * D system, a dedicated model is developed under the assumption of an isoscalar axial-vector $${{{{{{\rm{T}}}}}}}_{{{{{{\rm{c}}}}}}{{{{{\rm{c}}}}}}}^{+}$$ T c c + state decaying to the Dmore »* D channel. Using this model, resonance parameters including the pole position, scattering length, effective range and compositeness are determined to reveal important information about the nature of the $${{{{{{\rm{T}}}}}}}_{{{{{{\rm{c}}}}}}{{{{{\rm{c}}}}}}}^{+}$$ T c c + state. In addition, an unexpected dependence of the production rate on track multiplicity is observed.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available December 1, 2023
  5. The Askaryan Radio Array (ARA) is an ultrahigh energy (UHE, >10^17  eV) neutrino detector designed to observe neutrinos by searching for the radio waves emitted by the relativistic products of neutrino-nucleon interactions in Antarctic ice. In this paper, we present constraints on the diffuse flux of ultrahigh energy neutrinos between 1016 and 1021  eV resulting from a search for neutrinos in two complementary analyses, both analyzing four years of data (2013–2016) from the two deep stations (A2, A3) operating at that time. We place a 90% CL upper limit on the diffuse all flavor neutrino flux at 1018  eV of EF(E)=5.6×10^−16  cm^−2 s^−1 sr^−1. This analysis includes four times the exposure of the previous ARA result and represents approximately 1/5^th the exposure expected from operating ARA until the end of 2022.
  6. Abstract Conventional, hadronic matter consists of baryons and mesons made of three quarks and a quark–antiquark pair, respectively 1,2 . Here, we report the observation of a hadronic state containing four quarks in the Large Hadron Collider beauty experiment. This so-called tetraquark contains two charm quarks, a $$\overline{{{{{u}}}}}$$ u ¯ and a $$\overline{{{{{d}}}}}$$ d ¯ quark. This exotic state has a mass of approximately 3,875 MeV and manifests as a narrow peak in the mass spectrum of D 0 D 0 π + mesons just below the D *+ D 0 mass threshold. The near-threshold mass together with the narrow width reveals the resonance nature of the state.
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available July 1, 2023
  7. A bstract A precision measurement of the Z boson production cross-section at $$ \sqrt{\mathrm{s}} $$ s = 13 TeV in the forward region is presented, using pp collision data collected by the LHCb detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.1 fb − 1 . The production cross-section is measured using Z → μ + μ − events within the fiducial region defined as pseudorapidity 2 . 0 < η < 4 . 5 and transverse momentum p T > 20 GeV /c for both muons and dimuon invariant mass 60 < M μμ < 120 GeV /c 2 . The integrated cross-section is determined to be $$ \sigma \left(Z\to {\mu}^{+}{\mu}^{-}\right)=196.4\pm 0.2\pm 1.6\pm 3.9\ \mathrm{pb}, $$ σ Z → μ + μ − = 196.4 ± 0.2 ± 1.6 ± 3.9 pb , where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third is due to the luminosity determination. The measured results are in agreement with theoretical predictions within uncertainties.
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available July 1, 2023
  8. Free, publicly-accessible full text available June 1, 2023