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  1. Robust pervasive context-aware augmented reality (AR) has the potential to enable a range of applications that support users in reaching their personal and professional goals. In such applications, AR can be used to deliver richer, more immersive, and more timely just in time adaptive interventions (JITAI) than conventional mobile solutions, leading to more effective support of the user. This position paper defines a research agenda centered on improving AR applications' environmental, user, and social context awareness. Specifically, we argue for two key architectural approaches that will allow pushing AR context awareness to the next level: use of wearable and Internet of Things (IoT) devices as additional data streams that complement the data captured by the AR devices, and the development of edge computing-based mechanisms for enriching existing scene understanding and simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) algorithms. The paper outlines a collection of specific research directions in the development of such architectures and in the design of next-generation environmental, user, and social context awareness algorithms.
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available March 13, 2023
  2. Relative brain size has long been considered a reflection of cognitive capacities and has played a fundamental role in developing core theories in the life sciences. Yet, the notion that relative brain size validly represents selection on brain size relies on the untested assumptions that brain-body allometry is restrained to a stable scaling relationship across species and that any deviation from this slope is due to selection on brain size. Using the largest fossil and extant dataset yet assembled, we find that shifts in allometric slope underpin major transitions in mammalian evolution and are often primarily characterized by marked changes in body size. Our results reveal that the largest-brained mammals achieved large relative brain sizes by highly divergent paths. These findings prompt a reevaluation of the traditional paradigm of relative brain size and open new opportunities to improve our understanding of the genetic and developmental mechanisms that influence brain size.