skip to main content

Search for: All records

Creators/Authors contains: "Duran, Jorge"

Note: When clicking on a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) number, you will be taken to an external site maintained by the publisher. Some full text articles may not yet be available without a charge during the embargo (administrative interval).
What is a DOI Number?

Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.

  1. Abstract
    Soil temperature and soil moisture have been measured at multiple locations at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF), as part of a study of the relationships between snow depth, soil freezing and nutrient cycling (http://www.ecostudies.org/people_sci_groffman_snow_summary.html). In October 2010, we established 6, 20 x 20-m plots (intensive plots) and 14 10 x 10-m plots (extensive plots) along an elevation gradient, with eight of the plots on north-facing slopes and twelve on south-facing slopes. Soil temperature and soil moisture were measured at hourly intervals on these plots beginning in November 2010. Six locations were discontinued in September 2012 (E04, E05, E06, E11-B, E13, and E14). Previous versions of this dataset included both temperature and moisture. These data are now available as moisture(this dataset) and temperature (https://portal.edirepository.org/nis/mapbrowse?scope=knb-lter-hbr&identifier=315]. These data were gathered as part of the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (HBES). The HBES is a collaborative effort at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, which is operated and maintained by the USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station.
  2. Abstract
    Soil temperature and soil moisture have been measured at multiple locations at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF), as part of a study of the relationships between snow depth, soil freezing and nutrient cycling (http://www.ecostudies.org/people_sci_groffman_snow_summary.html). In October 2010, we established 6, 20 x 20-m plots (intensive plots) and 14 10 x 10-m plots (extensive plots) along an elevation gradient, with eight of the plots on north-facing slopes and twelve on south-facing slopes. Soil temperature and soil moisture were measured at hourly intervals on these plots beginning in November 2010. Six locations were discontinued in September 2012 (E04, E05, E06, E11-B, E13, and E14). Previous versions of this dataset included both temperature and moisture. These data are now available as temperature (this dataset) and moisture (https://portal.edirepository.org/nis/mapbrowse?scope=knb-lter-hbr&identifier=137). These data were gathered as part of the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (HBES). The HBES is a collaborative effort at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, which is operated and maintained by the USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station.
  3. Abstract
    These data are from four separate projects undertaken between 1997 and 2017. The first of these are two snow manipulation (freeze) projects: 1) In 1997, as part of a study of the relationships between snow depth, soil freezing and nutrient cycling, we established eight 10 x 10-m plots located within four stands; two dominated (80%) by sugar maple (SM1 and SM2) and two dominated by yellow birch(YB1 and YB2), with one snow reduction (shoveling) and one reference plot in each stand. 2) In 2001, we established eight new 10-m x 10-m plots (4 treatment, 4 reference) in four new sites; two high elevation, north facing and (East Kineo and West Kineo) two low elevation, south facing (Upper Valley and Lower Valley) maple-beech-birch stands. To establish plots, we cleared minor amounts of understory vegetation from all (both treatment and reference) plots (to facilitate shoveling). Treatments (keeping plots snow free by shoveling through the end of January) were applied in the winters of 1997/98, 1998/99, 2002/2003 and 2003/2004. The Climate Gradient Project was established in October 2010. Here we evaluated relationships between snow depth, soil freezing and nutrient cycling along an elevation/aspect gradient that created variation in climate with little variationMore>>