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  1. Free, publicly-accessible full text available April 21, 2023
  2. We demonstrate high fidelity two-qubit Rydberg blockade and entanglement in a two-dimensional qubit array. The qubit array is defined by a grid of blue detuned lines of light with 121 sites for trapping atomic qubits. Improved experimental methods have increased the observed Bell state fidelity to FBell = 0.86(2). Accounting for errors in state preparation and measurement (SPAM) we infer a fidelity of F−SPAM Bell = 0.89. Including errors in single qubit operations we infer that the Rydberg mediated CZ gate has a fidelity of F−SPAM CZ= 0.91. Comparison with a detailed error model shows that further improvement in fidelitymore »will require colder atoms and lasers with reduced noise.« less
  3. We present recent progress towards building a neutral atom quantum computer. We use a new design for a blue-detuned optical lattice to trap single Cs atoms. The lattice is created using a combination of diffractive elements and acousto-optic deflectors (AODs) which give a reconfigurable set of cross-hatched lines. By using AODs, we can vary the number of traps and size of the trapping regions as well as eliminate extraneous traps in Talbot planes. Since this trap uses blue-detuned light, it traps both ground state atoms and atoms excited to the Rydberg state; moreover, by tuning the size of the trappingmore »region, we can make the traps “magic” for a selected Rydberg state. We use an optical tweezer beam for atom rearrangement. When loading atoms into the array, trap sites randomly contain zero or one atoms. Atoms are then moved between different trapping sites using a red-detuned optical tweezer. Optimal atom rearrangement is calculated using the “Hungarian Method”. These rearrangement techniques can be used to create defect-free sub-lattices. Lattice atoms can also be used as a reservoir for a set of selected sites. This allows quick replacement of atoms, and increased data rate, without reloading from a MOT.« less