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  1. Abstract A number of recent, low-redshift, lensing measurements hint at a universe in which the amplitude of lensing is lower than that predicted from the ΛCDM model fit to the data of the Planck CMB mission. Here we use the auto- and cross-correlation signal of unWISE galaxies and Planck CMB lensing maps to infer cosmological parameters at low redshift. In particular, we consider three unWISE samples (denoted as "blue", "green" and "red") at median redshifts z ∼ 0.6, 1.1 and 1.5, which fully cover the Dark Energy dominated era. Our cross-correlation measurements, with combined significance S / N  ∼ 80, are used to infer the amplitude of low-redshift fluctuations, σ 8 ; the fraction of matter in the Universe, Ω m ; and the combination S 8  ≡ σ 8 (Ω m /0.3) 0.5 to which these low-redshift lensing measurements are most sensitive. The combination of blue, green and red samples gives a value S m  = 0.784 ± 0.015, that is fully consistent with other low-redshift lensing measurements and in 2.4σ tension with the CMB predictions from Planck. This is noteworthy, because CMB lensing probes the same physics as previous galaxy lensing measurements, but with very different systematics, thus providing an excellent complement to previous measurements.
  2. Abstract An observational program focused on the high redshift (2
  3. Abstract We use luminous red galaxies selected from the imaging surveys that are being used for targeting by the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) in combination with CMB lensing maps from the Planck collaboration to probe the amplitude of large-scale structure over 0.4 ≤  z  ≤ 1. Our galaxy sample, with an angular number density of approximately 500 deg -2 over 18,000 sq.deg., is divided into 4 tomographic bins by photometric redshift and the redshift distributions are calibrated using spectroscopy from DESI. We fit the galaxy autospectra and galaxy-convergence cross-spectra using models based on cosmological perturbation theory, restricting to large scales that are expected to be well described by such models. Within the context of ΛCDM, combining all 4 samples and using priors on the background cosmology from supernova and baryon acoustic oscillation measurements, we find S 8  = σ 8 (Ω m /0.3) 0.5  = 0.73 ± 0.03. This result is lower than the prediction of the ΛCDM model conditioned on the Planck data. Our data prefer a slower growth of structure at low redshift than the model predictions, though at only modest significance.
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available February 1, 2023
  4. Free, publicly-accessible full text available June 1, 2023
  5. Free, publicly-accessible full text available January 10, 2023
  6. ABSTRACT Reconstruction is becoming a crucial procedure of galaxy clustering analysis for future spectroscopic redshift surveys to obtain subper cent level measurement of the baryon acoustic oscillation scale. Most reconstruction algorithms rely on an estimation of the displacement field from the observed galaxy distribution. However, the displacement reconstruction degrades near the survey boundary due to incomplete data and the boundary effects extend to ${\sim}100\, \mathrm{Mpc}/h$ within the interior of the survey volume. We study the possibility of using radial velocities measured from the cosmic microwave background observation through the kinematic Sunyaev–Zeldovich effect to improve performance near the boundary. We find that the boundary effect can be reduced to ${\sim}30-40\, \mathrm{Mpc}/h$ with the velocity information from Simons Observatory. This is especially helpful for dense low redshift surveys where the volume is relatively small and a large fraction of total volume is affected by the boundary.