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  1. Although numerous programs exist in many institutions of higher education aimed at helping students from underrepresented groups achieve their goals of successfully graduating in a science, technology, mathematics, or engineering (STEM) field and moving on to the next educational level or a career, few are set up to support students across schools, from their entry into postsecondary education at the community college through the completion of their fouryear degree at a university and beyond. Furthermore, few programs are able to offer the full range of support that has been shown to be optimally effective toward promoting student success, as in, for example, the Building Engineering and Science Talent (BEST) model laid out by Chubin and Ward (2009). The reason for this is simple: rarely are the funds available from any given source to allow a program to provide all the supports students need. In this paper, we provide an example of how this problem was (at least partly) solved by the close interaction of two Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation and an S-STEM program, working within the context of other support opportunities at three community colleges and one university in Northern New Jersey. The programs and the mechanisms through which they support students are described and preliminary data examining their impacts are presented. 
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  2. The Computing Alliance of Hispanic Serving Institutions (CAHSI), a national INCLUDES alliance, is committed to supporting students in attaining credentials in computing. Its latest effort focuses on advancing undergraduate computing majors into graduate school to address the low numbers of Hispanics, or Latinx, attaining graduate degrees in computing. CAHSI expands adoption of evidence-based, multi-institutional graduate support structures that lead to Latinx students’ success. This paper describes strategic efforts to address well-documented barriers among graduate students (across all areas of study), e.g., feeling of isolation, lack of support structures, deficit thinking, and negative departmental climate. 
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  3. This paper presents an innovative approach, applicable to all research-based fields, that identifies and broadly engages future computer science researchers. The Computing Alliance of Hispanic Serving Institutions (CAHSI) piloted a national virtual Research Experience for Undergraduates (vREU) during the summer of 2020. Funded by an NSF grant, the goal of the program was to ensure that students, in particular those with financial need, had opportunities to engage in research and gain critical skills while advancing their knowledge and financial resources to complete their undergraduate degrees and possibly move to advanced studies. The vREU pilot provided undergraduate research experiences for 51 students and 21 faculty drawn from 14 colleges and universities. The Affinity Research Group (ARG) model, based on a cooperative learning model, was used to guide faculty mentors throughout the eight-week vREU. ARG is a CAHSI signature practice with a focus on deliberate, structured faculty and student research, technical, communication, and professional skills development. At weekly meetings, faculty were provided resources and discussed a specific skill to support students’ research experience and development, which faculty put into immediate practice with their students. Evaluation findings include no statistical difference in student development between the face-to-face and virtual models with faculty and the benefit of training as an opportunity for faculty professional growth and impact. This faculty development model allows for rapid dissemination of the ARG model through practice and application with weekly faculty cohort meetings, coaching, and reflection. 
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  4. Lu, B. ; Alvin, C. (Ed.)
    While undergraduate Computer Science (CS) degree programs typically prepare students for well-established roles (e.g. software developer, professor, and designer), several emergent CS career roles have gained prominence during the 21st century. CS majors (and students considering CS as a major) are often unaware of the wide range of careers available to job candidates with a CS background. This experience report describes seven innovative courses that broaden awareness of CS career roles and prepare students for technical interviews. Five courses prepared students for these career roles: Full-Stack Developer, Product Manager, ML or NLU Scientist, Technical Entrepreneur, and User Experience Designer/Developer/Researcher. The other two courses had traditional content but explicitly prepared students for technical interviews. These courses were co-developed by industry professionals and CS professors, and co-taught during a semester-long academic program. This paper highlights the replicable aspects of the program: the courses, teaching practices, and evaluation instruments (a teaching practices inventory and a data structures inventory). 
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  5. This paper presents an innovative approach, applicable to all research-based fields, that identifies and broadly engages future computer science researchers. The Computing Alliance of Hispanic Serving Institutions (CAHSI) piloted a national virtual Research Experience for Undergraduates (vREU) during the summer of 2020. Funded by an NSF grant, the goal of the program was to ensure that students, in particular those with financial need, had opportunities to engage in research and gain critical skills while advancing their knowledge and financial resources to complete their undergraduate degrees and possibly move to advanced studies. The vREU pilot provided undergraduate research experiences for 51 students and 21 faculty drawn from 14 colleges and universities. The Affinity Research Group (ARG) model, based on a cooperative learning model, was used to guide faculty mentors throughout the eight-week vREU. ARG is a CAHSI signature practice with a focus on deliberate, structured faculty and student research, technical, communication, and professional skills development. At weekly meetings, faculty were provided resources and discussed a specific skill to support students’ research experience and development, which faculty put into immediate practice with their students. Evaluation findings include no statistical difference in student development between the face-to-face and virtual models with faculty and the benefit of training as an opportunity for faculty professional growth and impact. This faculty development model allows for rapid dissemination of the ARG model through practice and application with weekly faculty cohort meetings, coaching, and reflection. 
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  6. To address the low number of baccalaureate degrees in computing to meet the demand for computing professionals, the Computing Alliance of Hispanic-Serving Institutions (CAHSI) was selected by the National Science Foundation (NSF) in 2018 to serve as the lead partner of a national INCLUDES alliance. The Inclusion Across the Nation of Communities of Learners (INCLUDES) initiative is one of NSF’s Ten Big Ideas with the goal of broadening participation in STEM fields by creating networked relationships among organizations and across sectors, using a collaborative approach with stakeholders who share a common agenda. The CAHSI Alliance is using the collective impact framework to accelerate change in broadening participation, particularly of Latinx, in computing fields. One aspect of collective impact is using a common set of data for decision-making within and across institutions. This paper will provide a short description of our data collection and analysis process, which helps populate a dashboard that compares student outcomes for each 2- and 4-year CAHSI institution with other institutions of higher education nationally.  
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  7. This Innovative Practice Work-In-Progress paper elucidates [redacted name of the alliance] approach for creating change by highlighting an effort across six institutions to support the delivery of one- and two-credit hour courses for three levels of problem solving: problem solving, computational thinking in problem solving, and algorithmic thinking in problem solving. The courses were developed to address feedback from industry partners regarding the need for improved problem-solving skills. The first of its kind for [name of Alliance], the problem-solving courses are fewer credit hours than typical courses designed to fit within traditional curriculum. The intent is to instill the complementary computational thinking skills and logical reasoning needed to succeed in computer science, and make this content available across different student populations at various stages in their academic pathways. The paper describes the process for designing the courses; the efforts to refine and improve course delivery, and the assessment and evaluation of the courses.  
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