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  1. Free, publicly-accessible full text available November 1, 2024
  2. Free, publicly-accessible full text available April 1, 2024
  3. Abstract The BlueFlux field campaign, supported by NASA’s Carbon Monitoring System, will develop prototype blue carbon products to inform coastal carbon management. While blue carbon has been suggested as a nature-based climate solution (NBS) to remove carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from the atmosphere, these ecosystems also release additional greenhouse gases (GHGs) such as methane (CH 4 ) and are sensitive to disturbances including hurricanes and sea-level rise. To understand blue carbon as an NBS, BlueFlux is conducting multi-scale measurements of CO 2 and CH 4 fluxes across coastal landscapes, combined with long-term carbon burial, in Southern Florida using chambers, flux towers, and aircraft combined with remote-sensing observations for regional upscaling. During the first deployment in April 2022, CO 2 uptake and CH 4 emissions across the Everglades National Park averaged −4.9 ± 4.7 μ mol CO 2 m −2 s −1 and 19.8 ± 41.1 nmol CH 4 m −2 s −1 , respectively. When scaled to the region, mangrove CH 4 emissions offset the mangrove CO 2 uptake by about 5% (assuming a 100 year CH 4 global warming potential of 28), leading to total net uptake of 31.8 Tg CO 2 -eq y −1 . Subsequent field campaigns will measure diurnal and seasonal changes in emissions and integrate measurements of long-term carbon burial to develop comprehensive annual and long-term GHG budgets to inform blue carbon as a climate solution. 
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    Free, publicly-accessible full text available July 1, 2024
  4. Abstract

    Climatic changes are transforming northern high‐latitude watersheds as permafrost thaws and vegetation and hydrology shift. These changes have implications for the source and reactivity of riverine dissolved organic matter (DOM), and thus biogeochemical cycling, across northern high‐latitude systems. In this study, we use a latitudinal gradient from the interior to the North Slope of Alaska to evaluate seasonal and landscape drivers of DOM composition in this changing Arctic environment. To assess DOM source and composition, we used absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy to measure DOM optical properties, lignin biomarker analyses to evaluate vascular plant contribution to the DOM pool, and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT‐ICR MS) to assess DOM compositional changes. We found that seasonal inputs of DOM at elevated discharge during the freshet were typically more aromatic in nature with higher lignin concentrations and carbon‐normalized yields. Landscape characteristics were a major control on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) yields and DOM composition. More northern watersheds, which were steeper, underlain by continuous permafrost, and exhibited a mix of barren and lichen/moss vegetation cover, exported less DOC with relatively more aliphatic DOM compared to more southern basins. Watersheds with deeper active layers exported DOM that was more aromatic with higher polyphenolic and condensed aromatic relative abundances and lignin yields, likely sourced from shallow subsurface flow during high discharge periods. However, contributions from deeper groundwater to streamflow is expected to increase, which would increase interactions of groundwater with mineral soils and decrease aromatic DOM contributions during periods of low discharge.

     
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