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  1. Free, publicly-accessible full text available March 1, 2023
  2. Free, publicly-accessible full text available December 1, 2022
  3. An understanding of the high-temperature copper oxide (cuprate) superconductors has eluded the physics community for over thirty years and represents one of the greatest unsolved problems in condensed matter physics. Particularly enigmatic is the normal state from which superconductivity emerges, so much so that this phase has been dubbed a “strange metal.” In this article, we review recent research into this strange metallic state as realized in the electron-doped cuprates with a focus on their transport properties. The electron-doped compounds differ in several ways from their more thoroughly studied hole-doped counterparts, and understanding these asymmetries of the phase diagram maymore »prove crucial to developing a final theory of the cuprates. Most of the experimental results discussed in this review have yet to be explained and remain an outstanding challenge for theory.« less
  4. In the physics of condensed matter, quantum critical phenomena and unconventional superconductivity are two major themes. In electron-doped cuprates, the low critical field (HC2) allows one to study the putative quantum critical point (QCP) at low temperature and to understand its connection to the long-standing problem of the origin of the high-TCsuperconductivity. Here we present measurements of the low-temperature normal-state thermopower (S) of the electron-doped cuprate superconductor La2−xCexCuO4(LCCO) fromx= 0.11–0.19. We observe quantum criticalS/Tversusln(1/T)behavior over an unexpectedly wide doping rangex= 0.15–0.17 above the QCP (x= 0.14), with a slope that scales monotonicallymore »with the superconducting transition temperature (TCwith H = 0). The presence of quantum criticality over a wide doping range provides a window on the criticality. The thermopower behavior also suggests that the critical fluctuations are linked withTC. Above the superconductivity dome, atx= 0.19, a conventional Fermi-liquidSTbehavior is found forT40 K.

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  5. An understanding of the normal state in the high-temperature superconducting cuprates is crucial to the ultimate understanding of the long-standing problem of the origin of the superconductivity itself. This so-called “strange metal” state is thought to be associated with a quantum critical point (QCP) hidden beneath the superconductivity. In electron-doped cuprates—in contrast to hole-doped cuprates—it is possible to access the normal state at very low temperatures and low magnetic fields to study this putative QCP and to probe the T ➔ 0 K state of these materials. We report measurements of the low-temperature normal-state magnetoresistance (MR) of the n-type cupratemore »system La 2− x Ce x CuO 4 and find that it is characterized by a linear-in-field behavior, which follows a scaling relation with applied field and temperature, for doping ( x ) above the putative QCP ( x = 0.14). The magnitude of the unconventional linear MR decreases as T c decreases and goes to zero at the end of the superconducting dome ( x ~ 0.175) above which a conventional quadratic MR is found. These results show that there is a strong correlation between the quantum critical excitations of the strange metal state and the high- T c superconductivity.« less