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  1. Free, publicly-accessible full text available July 10, 2024
  2. Hamiltonian Monte Carlo (HMC) is a powerful algorithm to sample latent variables from Bayesian models. The advent of probabilistic programming languages (PPLs) frees users from writing inference algorithms and lets users focus on modeling. However, many models are difficult for HMC to solve directly, and often require tricks like model reparameterization. We are motivated by the fact that many of those models could be simplified by marginalization. We propose to use automatic marginalization as part of the sampling process using HMC in a graphical model extracted from a PPL, which substantially improves sampling from real-world hierarchical models. 
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    Free, publicly-accessible full text available July 1, 2024
  3. The NUMA architecture accommodates the hardware trend of an increasing number of CPU cores. It requires the cooperation of memory allocators to achieve good performance for multithreaded applications. Unfortunately, existing allocators do not support NUMA architecture well. This paper presents a novel memory allocator – NUMAlloc, that is designed for the NUMA architecture. is centered on a binding-based memory management. On top of it, proposes an “origin-aware memory management” to ensure the locality of memory allocations and deallocations, as well as a method called “incremental sharing” to balance the performance benefits and memory overhead of using transparent huge pages. According to our extensive evaluation, NUMAlloc has the best performance among all evaluated allocators, running 15.7% faster than the second-best allocator (mimalloc), and 20.9% faster than the default Linux allocator with reasonable memory overhead. NUMAlloc is also scalable to 128 threads and is ready for deployment. 
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  4. Deep neural networks (DNNs) are becoming increasingly deeper, wider, and non-linear due to the growing demands on prediction accuracy and analysis quality. Training wide and deep neural networks require large amounts of storage resources such as memory because the intermediate activation data must be saved in the memory during forward propagation and then restored for backward propagation. However, state-of-the-art accelerators such as GPUs are only equipped with very limited memory capacities due to hardware design constraints, which significantly limits the maximum batch size and hence performance speedup when training large-scale DNNs. Traditional memory saving techniques either suffer from performance overhead or are constrained by limited interconnect bandwidth or specific interconnect technology. In this paper, we propose a novel memory-efficient CNN training framework (called COMET) that leverages error-bounded lossy compression to significantly reduce the memory requirement for training in order to allow training larger models or to accelerate training. Our framework purposely adopts error-bounded lossy compression with a strict error-controlling mechanism. Specifically, we perform a theoretical analysis on the compression error propagation from the altered activation data to the gradients, and empirically investigate the impact of altered gradients over the training process. Based on these analyses, we optimize the error-bounded lossy compression and propose an adaptive error-bound control scheme for activation data compression. Experiments demonstrate that our proposed framework can significantly reduce the training memory consumption by up to 13.5X over the baseline training and 1.8X over another state-of-the-art compression-based framework, respectively, with little or no accuracy loss. 
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