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Creators/Authors contains: "Im, Wonpil"

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  4. Abstract

    Structural and mechanistic studies on human odorant receptors (ORs), key in olfactory signaling, are challenging because of their low surface expression in heterologous cells. The recent structure of OR51E2 bound to propionate provided molecular insight into odorant recognition, but the lack of an inactive OR structure limited understanding of the activation mechanism of ORs upon odorant binding. Here, we determined the cryo-electron microscopy structures of consensus OR52 (OR52cs), a representative of the OR52 family, in the ligand-free (apo) and octanoate-bound states. The apo structure of OR52csreveals a large opening between transmembrane helices (TMs) 5 and 6. A comparison between the apo and active structures of OR52csdemonstrates the inward and outward movements of the extracellular and intracellular segments of TM6, respectively. These results, combined with molecular dynamics simulations and signaling assays, shed light on the molecular mechanisms of odorant binding and activation of the OR52 family.

     
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    Free, publicly-accessible full text available December 1, 2024
  5. Homodimeric class 1 cytokine receptors include the erythropoietin (EPOR), thrombopoietin (TPOR), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor 3 (CSF3R), growth hormone (GHR), and prolactin receptors (PRLR). These cell-surface single-pass transmembrane (TM) glycoproteins regulate cell growth, proliferation, and differentiation and induce oncogenesis. An active TM signaling complex consists of a receptor homodimer, one or two ligands bound to the receptor extracellular domains and two molecules of Janus Kinase 2 (JAK2) constitutively associated with the receptor intracellular domains. Although crystal structures of soluble extracellular domains with ligands have been obtained for all the receptors except TPOR, little is known about the structure and dynamics of the complete TM complexes that activate the downstream JAK-STAT signaling pathway. Three-dimensional models of five human receptor complexes with cytokines and JAK2 were generated here using AlphaFold Multimer. Given the large size of the complexes (from 3220 to 4074 residues), the modeling required a stepwise assembly from smaller parts with selection and validation of the models through comparisons with published experimental data. The modeling of active and inactive complexes supports a general activation mechanism that involves ligand binding to a monomeric receptor followed by receptor dimerization and rotational movement of the receptor TM α-helices causing proximity, dimerization, and activation of associated JAK2 subunits. The binding mode of two eltrombopag molecules to TM α-helices of the active TPOR dimer was proposed. The models also help elucidating the molecular basis of oncogenic mutations that may involve a non-canonical activation route. Models equilibrated in explicit lipids of the plasma membrane are publicly available. 
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    Free, publicly-accessible full text available September 11, 2024
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  7. A melamine-based glucoside, MG-C11, has the ability to form a dynamic hydrogen-bonding network between detergent molecules, responsible for the markedly enhanced efficacy for GPCR stabilization compared to LMNG and previously developed TTG-C11.

     
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    Free, publicly-accessible full text available November 22, 2024
  8. The B cell and T cell antigen receptors (BCR and TCR) share a common architecture in which variable dimeric antigen-binding modules assemble with invariant dimeric signaling modules to form functional receptor complexes. In the TCR, a highly conserved T cell receptor αβ (TCRαβ) transmembrane (TM) interface forms a rigid structure around which its three dimeric signaling modules assemble through well-characterized polar interactions. Noting that the key features stabilizing this TCRαβ TM interface also appear with high evolutionary conservation in the TM sequences of the membrane immunoglobulin (mIg) heavy chains that form the BCR’s homodimeric antigen-binding module, we asked whether the BCR contained an analogous TM structure. Using an unbiased biochemical and computational modeling approach, we found that the mouse IgM BCR forms a core TM structure that is remarkably similar to that of the TCR. This structure is reinforced by a network of interhelical hydrogen bonds, and our model is nearly identical to the arrangement observed in the just-released cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of intact human BCRs. Our biochemical analysis shows that the integrity of this TM structure is vital for stable assembly with the BCR signaling module CD79AB in the B cell endoplasmic reticulum, and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that BCRs of all five isotypes can form comparable structures. These results demonstrate that, despite their many differences in composition, complexity, and ligand type, TCRs and BCRs rely on a common core TM structure that has been shaped by evolution for optimal receptor assembly and stability in the cell membrane. 
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