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Creators/Authors contains: "Jiang, Chunheng"

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  1. Abstract Despite the advances in discovering new nuclei, modeling microscopic nuclear structure, nuclear reactors, and stellar nucleosynthesis, we still lack a systemic tool, such as a network approach, to understand the structure and dynamics of over 70 thousands reactions compiled in JINA REACLIB. To this end, we develop an analysis framework, under which it is simple to know which reactions generally are possible and which are not, by counting neutrons and protons incoming to and outgoing from any target nucleus. Specifically, we assemble here a nuclear reaction network in which a node represents a nuclide, and a link represents a direct reaction between nuclides. Interestingly, the degree distribution of nuclear network exhibits a bimodal distribution that significantly deviates from the common power-law distribution of scale-free networks and Poisson distribution of random networks. Based on the dynamics from the cross section parameterizations in REACLIB, we surprisingly find that the distribution is universal for reactions with a rate below the threshold, λ < e − T γ , where T is the temperature and γ ≈ 1.05. Moreover, we discover three rules that govern the structure pattern of nuclear reaction network: (i) reaction-type is determined by linking choices, (ii) network distances between the reacting nuclides on 2D grid of Z vs N of nuclides are short, and (iii) each node in- and out-degrees are close to each other. By incorporating these three rules, our model universally unveils the underlying nuclear reaction patterns hidden in a large and dense nuclear reaction network regardless of nuclide chart expansions. It enables us to predict missing links that represent possible new nuclear reactions not yet discovered. 
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