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  1. The pandemic outbreak of COVID-19 has highlighted an urgent need for infectious disease education for K-12 students. To gather a better understanding of what educational interventions have been conducted and to what effect, we performed a scoping review. We identified and examined 23 empirical researcher- and teacher-designed studies conducted in the last 20 years that have reported on efforts to help K-12 students learn about infectious diseases, with a focus on respiratory transmission. Our review shows studies of educational interventions on this topic are rare, especially with regard to the more population-scale (vs. cellular level) concepts of epidemiology. Furthermore, efforts to educate youth about infectious disease primarily focused on secondary school students, with an emphasis on interactive learning environments to model or simulate both cellular-level and population-level attributes of infectious disease. Studies were only mildly successful in raising science interest, with somewhat stronger findings on helping students engage in scientific inquiry on the biology of infectious diseases and/or community spread. Most importantly, efforts left out critical dimensions of transmission dynamics key to understanding implications for public health. Based on our review, we articulate implications for further research and development in this important domain. 
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  2. Over the past decade, initiatives around the world have introduced computing into K–12 education under the umbrella of computational thinking. While initial implementations focused on skills and knowledge for college and career readiness, more recent framings include situated computational thinking (identity, participation, creative expression) and critical computational thinking (political and ethical impacts of computing, justice). This expansion reflects a revaluation of what it means for learners to be computationally-literate in the 21st century. We review the current landscape of K–12 computing education, discuss interactions between different framings of computational thinking, and consider how an encompassing framework of computational literacies clarifies the importance of computing for broader K–12 educational priorities as well as key unresolved issues. 
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  3. While many digital or physical tools and construction kits have been developed for young makers, far fewer developments have focused on making with living materials, at DNA and cellular scales. In this paper, we review the affordances of various hands-on simulation tools and wet labs for K-12-aged biomakers to be used in school, home and science centers. We discuss how making with biology requires broadened conceptualizations of perceptibility, tinkerability, expressivity, and usability---features commonly considered in the research and design of digital and physical maker media. We conclude with a discussion of affordances and challenges we see in the current generation of tools and labs for supporting making with biology and in which ways these can be expanded to support learning, collaboration, and creativity that are valued in maker education. 
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  6. Computational thinking has become the calling card for re-introducing coding into schools. While much attention has focused on how students engage in designing systems, applications, and other computational artifacts as a measure of success for computational thinking, far fewer efforts have focused on what goes into remediating problems in designing systems and interactions because learners invariably make mistakes that need fixing-or debugging. In this panel, we examine the often overlooked practice of debugging that presents significant learning challenges (and opportunities) to students in completing assignments and instructional challenges to teachers in helping students to succeed in their classrooms. The panel participants will review what we know and don't know about debugging, discuss ways to conceptualize and study debugging, and present instructional approaches for helping teachers and students to engage productively in debugging situations. 
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  7. While much research focused on making emphasizes digital and tangible media, few studies have explored making with biology, or biomaking, where people use cells as fabrication units to grow or “make” desired materials for designing real world applications. This lack is especially glaring considering how biomaking and related industries are often aligned with a growing push toward sustainable production as a way of addressing the pressing environmental issues of the day. In order address how maker frameworks could be used as a productive way of bringing biomaking into K-12 contexts, we report on the design and implementation of a biomaking workshop where teams of high school students both assembled a physical biosensor and imagined applications for this technology to address real world issues. Using classroom observations, analysis of classroom projects, and focus group interviews, we examined student experiences and perceptions of these activities in order to ask: What the affordances and challenges of biomaking in supporting maker learning, especially with regard to the less common practices of assembly and imagining? In the discussion, we review what we learned about facilitating biomaking in K-12 setting, as well how our analysis led us to a revaluation of the often crucial but neglected role assembly plays in more ‘typical’ maker activities, and the possibilities for enriching maker activities by including design prototyping and imagination. 
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  8. In this paper, we present an iteration on a “reconstruction kit” for e-textiles, a flexible-state construction kit that allows for rapid deconstruction and reconstruction of sewn, programmable circuits. The reconstruction kit was redesigned to be more modular and was tested in more computationally and spatially challenging debugging and design situations. by four pairs of˛ students familiar with e-textiles taking an introductory computer science course in a U.S. high school. Analyzing think-aloud protocols of the four sessions, we examined affordances and limitations of how student debugged and designed with the reconstruction kit and in which ways collaborative interactions were supported. 
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  9. In this paper, we present the development of a "reconstruction kit" for e-textiles, which transforms fixed-state construction kits---maker tools and technologies that focus on the creation of semi-permanent projects---into flex-state construction kits that allow for endless deconstruction and reconstruction. The kit uses modular pieces that allow students to both solve and create troubleshooting and debugging challenges, which we call "DebugIts." We tested our prototype in an after-school workshop with ten high school students, and report on how they interacted with the kit, as well as what they learned through the DebugIt activities. In the discussion, we delve into the affordances and challenges of using these kits as both learning and assessment tools. We also discuss how our pilot and prototype can inform the design of reconstruction kits in other areas of making. 
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