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  1. III, Hal Daumé (Ed.)
    Since hardware resources are limited, the objective of training deep learning models is typically to maximize accuracy subject to the time and memory constraints of training and inference. We study the impact of model size in this setting, focusing on Transformer models for NLP tasks that are limited by compute: self-supervised pretraining and high-resource machine translation. We first show that even though smaller Transformer models execute faster per iteration, wider and deeper models converge in significantly fewer steps. Moreover, this acceleration in convergence typically outpaces the additional computational overhead of using larger models. Therefore, the most compute-efficient training strategy is to counterintuitively train extremely large models but stop after a small number of iterations. This leads to an apparent trade-off between the training efficiency of large Transformer models and the inference efficiency of small Transformer models. However, we show that large models are more robust to compression techniques such as quantization and pruning than small models. Consequently, one can get the best of both worlds: heavily compressed, large models achieve higher accuracy than lightly compressed, small models.
  2. Simulation-to-real domain adaptation for semantic segmentation has been actively studied for various applications such as autonomous driving. Existing methods mainly focus on a single-source setting, which cannot easily handle a more practical scenario of multiple sources with different distributions. In this paper, we propose to investigate multi-source domain adaptation for semantic segmentation. Specifically, we design a novel framework, termed Multi-source Adversarial Domain Aggregation Network (MADAN), which can be trained in an end-to-end manner. First, we generate an adapted domain for each source with dynamic semantic consistency while aligning at the pixel-level cycle-consistently towards the target. Second, we propose sub-domain aggregation discriminator and cross-domain cycle discriminator to make different adapted domains more closely aggregated. Finally, feature-level alignment is performed between the aggregated domain and target domain while training the segmentation network. Extensive experiments from synthetic GTA and SYNTHIA to real Cityscapes and BDDS datasets demonstrate that the proposed MADAN model outperforms state-of-the-art approaches. Our source code is released at: https://github.com/Luodian/MADAN.