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  1. Abstract

    Limited information on greenhouse gas emissions from tropical dry forest soils still hinders the assessment of the sources/sinks from this ecosystem and their contribution at global scales. Particularly, rewetting events after the dry season can have a significant effect on soil biogeochemical processes and associated exchange of greenhouse gases. This study evaluated the temporal variation and annual fluxes of CO2, N2O, and CH4from soils in a tropical dry forest successional gradient. After a prolonged drought of 5 months, large emissions pulses of CO2and N2O were observed at all sites following first rain events, caused by the “Birch effect,” with a significant effect on the net ecosystem exchange and the annual emissions budget. Annual CO2emissions were greatest for the young forest (8,556 kg C ha−1yr−1) followed by the older forest (7,420 kg C ha−1yr−1) and the abandoned pasture (7,224 kg C ha−1yr−1). Annual emissions of N2O were greatest for the forest sites (0.39 and 0.43 kg N ha−1yr−1) and least in the abandoned pasture (0.09 kg N ha−1yr−1). CH4uptake was greatest in the older forest (−2.61 kg C ha−1yr−1) followed by the abandoned pasture (−0.69 kg C ha−1yr−1) and the young forest (−0.58 kg C ha−1yr−1). Fluxes were mainly influenced by soil moisture, microbial biomass, and soil nitrate and ammonium concentrations. Annual CO2and N2O soil fluxes of tropical dry forests in this study and others from the literature were much lower than the annual fluxes in wetter tropical forests. Conversely, tropical dry forests and abandoned pastures are on average stronger sinks for CH4than wetter tropical forests.

     
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  2. Abstract Research infrastructures play a key role in launching a new generation of integrated long-term, geographically distributed observation programmes designed to monitor climate change, better understand its impacts on global ecosystems, and evaluate possible mitigation and adaptation strategies. The pan-European Integrated Carbon Observation System combines carbon and greenhouse gas (GHG; CO 2 , CH 4 , N 2 O, H 2 O) observations within the atmosphere, terrestrial ecosystems and oceans. High-precision measurements are obtained using standardised methodologies, are centrally processed and openly available in a traceable and verifiable fashion in combination with detailed metadata. The Integrated Carbon Observation System ecosystem station network aims to sample climate and land-cover variability across Europe. In addition to GHG flux measurements, a large set of complementary data (including management practices, vegetation and soil characteristics) is collected to support the interpretation, spatial upscaling and modelling of observed ecosystem carbon and GHG dynamics. The applied sampling design was developed and formulated in protocols by the scientific community, representing a trade-off between an ideal dataset and practical feasibility. The use of open-access, high-quality and multi-level data products by different user communities is crucial for the Integrated Carbon Observation System in order to achieve its scientific potential and societal value. 
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