skip to main content


Search for: All records

Creators/Authors contains: "LaNasa, Jacob A."

Note: When clicking on a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) number, you will be taken to an external site maintained by the publisher. Some full text articles may not yet be available without a charge during the embargo (administrative interval).
What is a DOI Number?

Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.

  1. Free, publicly-accessible full text available January 12, 2025
  2. Associative surfactants systems involving polar oils have recently been shown to stabilize immiscible liquids by forming nanostructures at the liquid interface and have been used to print soft materials. Although these associating surfactant systems show great promise for creating nanostructured soft materials, a fundamental understanding of the self-assembly process is still unknown. In this study, a ternary phase diagram for a system of cationic surfactant cetylpyridinium chloride monohydrate (CPCl), a polar oil (oleic acid), and water is established using experiment and simulation, to study the equilibrium phase behavior. A combination of visual inspection, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and rheological measurements was employed to establish the phase behavior and properties of the self-assembled materials. Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) is used to simulate the formation of the morphologies in this system and support the experimental results. The ternary phase diagram obtained from the simulations agrees with the experimental results, indicating the robustness of the computational simulation as a supplement to the mesoscale experimental systems. We observe that morphological transitions ( e.g. , micelle-to-bilayer and vesicle-to-lamellar) are in agreement between experiments and simulations across the ternary diagram. DPD simulations correctly predict that associative surfactant systems form new nanoscale phases due to the co-assembly of the components. The established ternary phase diagram and the DPD model pave the way towards predicting and controlling the formation of different mesostructures like lamellar or vesicles, opening new avenues to tailor and synthesize desired morphologies for applications related to liquid-in-liquid 3D printing. 
    more » « less
  3. Thermoplastic elastomers based on ABA triblock copolymers are typically limited in modulus and strength due to crack propagation within the brittle regions when the hard end-block composition favors morphologies that exhibit connected domains. Increasing the threshold end-block composition to achieve enhanced mechanical performance is possible by increasing the number of junctions or bridging points per chain, but these copolymer characteristics also tend to increase the complexity of the synthesis. Here, we report an in situ polymerization method to successfully increase the number of effective junctions per chain through grafting of poly(styrene) (PS) to a commercial thermoplastic elastomer, poly(styrene)–poly(butadiene)–poly(styrene) (SBS). The strategy described here transforms a linear SBS triblock copolymer–styrene mixture into a linear-comb-linear architecture in which poly(styrene) (PS) grafts from the mid-poly(butadiene) (PBD) block during the polymerization of styrene. Through systematic variation in the initial SBS/styrene content, nanostructural transitions from disordered spheres to lamellar through reaction-induced phase transitions (RIPT) were identified as the styrene content increased. Surprisingly, maximum mechanical performance (Young's modulus, tensile strength, and elongation at break) was obtained with samples exhibiting lamellar nanostructures, corresponding to overall PS contents of 61–77 wt% PS (including the original PS in SBS). The PS grafting from the PBD block increases the modulus and the strength of the thermoplastic elastomer while preventing brittle fracture due to the greater number of junctions afforded by the PS grafts. The work presented here demonstrates the use of RIPT to transform standard SBS materials into polymer systems with enhanced mechanical properties. 
    more » « less
  4. Abstract

    The ability to print soft materials into predefined architectures with programmable nanostructures and mechanical properties is a necessary requirement for creating synthetic biomaterials that mimic living tissues. However, the low viscosity of common materials and lack of required mechanical properties in the final product present an obstacle to the use of traditional additive manufacturing approaches. Here, a new liquid‐in‐liquid 3D printing approach is used to successfully fabricate constructs with internal nanostructures using in situ self‐assembly during the extrusion of an aqueous solution containing surfactant and photocurable polymer into a stabilizing polar oil bath. Subsequent photopolymerization preserves the nanostructures created due to surfactant self‐assembly at the immiscible liquid–liquid interface, which is confirmed by small‐angle X‐ray scattering. Mechanical properties of the photopolymerized prints are shown to be tunable based on constituent components of the aqueous solution. The reported 3D printing approach expands the range of low‐viscosity materials that can be used in 3D printing, and enables robust constructs production with internal nanostructures and spatially defined features. The reported approach has broad applications in regenerative medicine by providing a platform to print self‐assembling biomaterials into complex tissue mimics where internal supramolecular structures and their functionality control biological processes, similar to natural extracellular matrices.

     
    more » « less
  5. The long-standing goal in membrane development is creating materials with superior transport properties, including both high flux and high selectivity. These properties are common in biological membranes, and thus mimicking nature is a promising strategy towards improved membrane design. In previous studies, we have shown that artificial water channels can have excellent water transport abilities that are comparable to biological water channel proteins, aquaporins. In this study, we propose a strategy for incorporation of artificial channels that mimic biological channels into stable polymeric membranes. Specifically, we synthesized an amphiphilic triblock copolymer, poly(isoprene)– block –poly(ethylene oxide)– block –poly(isoprene), which is a high molecular weight synthetic analog of naturally occurring lipids in terms of its self-assembled structure. This polymer was used to build stacked membranes composed of self-assembled lamellae. The resulting membranes resemble layers of natural lipid bilayers in living systems, but with superior mechanical properties suitable for real-world applications. The procedures used to synthesize the triblock copolymer resulted in membranes with increased stability due to the crosslinkability of the hydrophobic domains. Furthermore, the introduction of bridging hydrophilic domains leads to the preservation of the stacked membrane structure when the membrane is in contact with water, something that is challenging for diblock lamellae that tend to swell, and delaminate in aqueous solutions. This new method of membrane fabrication offers a practical model for making channel-based biomimetic membranes, which may lead to technological applications in reverse osmosis, nanofiltration, and ultrafiltration membranes. 
    more » « less