skip to main content

Attention:

The NSF Public Access Repository (NSF-PAR) system and access will be unavailable from 5:00 PM ET until 11:00 PM ET on Friday, June 21 due to maintenance. We apologize for the inconvenience.


Search for: All records

Creators/Authors contains: "Li, Xiangrui"

Note: When clicking on a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) number, you will be taken to an external site maintained by the publisher. Some full text articles may not yet be available without a charge during the embargo (administrative interval).
What is a DOI Number?

Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.

  1. null (Ed.)
    Convolutional neural networks (CNNs) have achieved state-of- the-art performance on various tasks in computer vision. However, recent studies demonstrate that these models are vulnerable to carefully crafted adversarial samples and suffer from a significant performance drop when predicting them. Many methods have been proposed to improve adversarial robustness (e.g., adversarial training and new loss functions to learn adversarially robust feature representations). Here we offer a unique insight into the predictive behavior of CNNs that they tend to misclassify adversarial samples into the most probable false classes. This inspires us to propose a new Probabilistically Compact (PC) loss with logit constraints which can be used as a drop-in replacement for cross-entropy (CE) loss to improve CNN’s adversarial robustness. Specifically, PC loss enlarges the probability gaps between true class and false classes meanwhile the logit constraints prevent the gaps from being melted by a small perturbation. We extensively compare our method with the state-of-the-art using large scale datasets under both white-box and black-box attacks to demonstrate its effectiveness. The source codes are available at https://github.com/xinli0928/PC-LC. 
    more » « less
  2. Deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) trained with logistic and softmax losses have made significant advancement in visual recognition tasks in computer vision. When training data exhibit class imbalances, the class-wise reweighted version of logistic and softmax losses are often used to boost performance of the unweighted version. In this paper, motivated to explain the reweighting mechanism, we explicate the learning property of those two loss functions by analyzing the necessary condition (e.g., gradient equals to zero) after training CNNs to converge to a local minimum. The analysis immediately provides us explanations for understanding (1) quantitative effects of the class-wise reweighting mechanism: deterministic effectiveness for binary classification using logistic loss yet indeterministic for multi-class classification using softmax loss; (2) disadvantage of logistic loss for single-label multi-class classification via one-vs.-all approach, which is due to the averaging effect on predicted probabilities for the negative class (e.g., non-target classes) in the learning process. With the disadvantage and advantage of logistic loss disentangled, we thereafter propose a novel reweighted logistic loss for multi-class classification. Our simple yet effective formulation improves ordinary logistic loss by focusing on learning hard non-target classes (target vs. non-target class in one-vs.-all) and turned out to be competitive with softmax loss. We evaluate our method on several benchmark datasets to demonstrate its effectiveness. 
    more » « less
  3. null (Ed.)
  4. Abstract

    Typical fMRI studies have focused on either the mean trend in the blood‐oxygen‐level‐dependent (BOLD) time course or functional connectivity (FC). However, other statistics of the neuroimaging data may contain important information. Despite studies showing links between the variance in the BOLD time series (BV) and age and cognitive performance, a formal framework for testing these effects has not yet been developed. We introduce the variance design general linear model (VDGLM), a novel framework that facilitates the detection of variance effects. We designed the framework for general use in any fMRI study by modeling both mean and variance in BOLD activation as a function of experimental design. The flexibility of this approach allows the VDGLM to (a) simultaneously make inferences about a mean or variance effect while controlling for the other and (b) test for variance effects that could be associated with multiple conditions and/or noise regressors. We demonstrate the use of the VDGLM in a working memory application and show that engagement in a working memory task is associated with whole‐brain decreases in BOLD variance.

     
    more » « less