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  1. Abstract The accurate simulation of additional interactions at the ATLAS experiment for the analysis of proton–proton collisions delivered by the Large Hadron Collider presents a significant challenge to the computing resources. During the LHC Run 2 (2015–2018), there were up to 70 inelastic interactions per bunch crossing, which need to be accounted for in Monte Carlo (MC) production. In this document, a new method to account for these additional interactions in the simulation chain is described. Instead of sampling the inelastic interactions and adding their energy deposits to a hard-scatter interaction one-by-one, the inelastic interactions are presampled, independent of the hardmore »scatter, and stored as combined events. Consequently, for each hard-scatter interaction, only one such presampled event needs to be added as part of the simulation chain. For the Run 2 simulation chain, with an average of 35 interactions per bunch crossing, this new method provides a substantial reduction in MC production CPU needs of around 20%, while reproducing the properties of the reconstructed quantities relevant for physics analyses with good accuracy.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available December 1, 2023
  2. The ternary chalcogenide Cu3VSe4 (CVSe) with sulvanite structure has been theoretically predicted to be a promising candidate for photovoltaic applications due to its suitable band-gap for solar absorption and the relatively earth-abundant elements in its composition. To realize the absorber layer via an inexpensive route, printed thin-films could be fabricated from dispersions of nano-sized Cu3VSe4 precursors. Herein, cubic Cu3VSe4 nanocrystals were successfully synthesized via a hot-injection method. Similar with reported Cu3VS4 nanocrystals, Cu3VSe4 nanocrystals with cubic structure exhibit three absorption bands in the UV-Visible range indicative of a potential intermediate bandgap existence. A thin film fabricated by depositing the nanoparticlesmore »Cu3VSe4 on FTO coated glass substrate, exhibited a p-type behavior and a photocurrent of ~ 4 μA/cm2 when measured in an electrochemical cell setting. This first demonstration of photocurrent exhibited by a CVSe nanocrystals thin film signifies a promising potential in photovoltaic applications.« less
  3. Free, publicly-accessible full text available July 1, 2022
  4. Cyber insurance like other types of insurance is a method of risk transfer, where the insured pays a premium in exchange for coverage in the event of a loss. As a result of the reduced risk for the insured and the lack of information on the insurer’s side, the insured is generally inclined to lower its effort, leading to a worse state of security, a common phenomenon known as moral hazard. To mitigate moral hazard, a widely employed concept is premium discrimination, i.e., an agent/insured who exerts higher effort pays less premium. This, however, relies on the insurer’s ability tomore »assess the effort exerted by the insured. In this paper, we study two methods of premium discrimination that rely on two different types of assessment: pre-screening and post-screening. Pre-screening occurs before the insured enters into a contract and can be done at the beginning of each contract period; the result of this process gives the insurer an estimated risk on the insured, which then determines the contract terms. The post-screening mechanism involves at least two contract periods whereby the second-period premium is increased if a loss event occurs during the first period. Prior work shows that both pre-screening and post-screening are generally effective in mitigating moral hazard and increasing the insured’s effort. The analysis in this study shows, however, that the conclusion becomes more nuanced when loss events are rare. Specifically, we show that post-screening is not effective at all with rare losses, while pre-screening can be an effective method when the agent perceives them as rarer than the insurer does; in this case pre-screening improves both the agent’s effort level and the insurer’s profit.« less