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  1. Abstract

    Thermal energy management in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) is an important, yet often neglected, challenge for many adsorption-based applications such as gas storage and separations. Despite its importance, there is insufficient understanding of the structure-property relationships governing thermal transport in MOFs. To provide a data-driven perspective into these relationships, here we perform large-scale computational screening of thermal conductivitykin MOFs, leveraging classical molecular dynamics simulations and 10,194 hypothetical MOFs created using the ToBaCCo 3.0 code. We found that high thermal conductivity in MOFs is favored by high densities (> 1.0 g cm−3), small pores (< 10 Å), and four-connected metal nodes. We also found that 36 MOFs exhibit ultra-low thermal conductivity (< 0.02 W m−1 K−1), which is primarily due to having extremely large pores (~65 Å). Furthermore, we discovered six hypothetical MOFs with very high thermal conductivity (> 10 W m−1 K−1), the structures of which we describe in additional detail.

  2. Metal-metal bonding interactions can engender outstanding magnetic properties in bulk materials and molecules, and examples abound for the transition metals. Extending this paradigm to the lanthanides, herein we report mixed-valence dilanthanide complexes (Cp iPr5 ) 2 Ln 2 I 3 (Ln is Gd, Tb, or Dy; Cp i Pr5 , pentaisopropylcyclopentadienyl), which feature a singly occupied lanthanide-lanthanide σ-bonding orbital of 5 d z 2 parentage, as determined by structural, spectroscopic, and computational analyses. Valence delocalization, wherein the d electron is equally shared by the two lanthanide centers, imparts strong parallel alignment of the σ-bonding and f electrons on both lanthanides according to Hund’s rules. The combination of a well-isolated high-spin ground state and large magnetic anisotropy in (Cp iPr5 ) 2 Dy 2 I 3 gives rise to an enormous coercive magnetic field with a lower bound of 14 tesla at temperatures as high as 60 kelvin.
  3. The use of radical bridging ligands to facilitate strong magnetic exchange between paramagnetic metal centers represents a key step toward the realization of single-molecule magnets with high operating temperatures. Moreover, bridging ligands that allow the incorporation of high-anisotropy metal ions are particularly advantageous. Toward these ends, we report the synthesis and detailed characterization of the dinuclear hydroquinone-bridged complexes [(Me 6 tren) 2 MII2(C 6 H 4 O 2 2− )] 2+ (Me 6 tren = tris(2-dimethylaminoethyl)amine; M = Fe, Co, Ni) and their one-electron-oxidized, semiquinone-bridged analogues [(Me 6 tren) 2 MII2(C 6 H 4 O 2 − ˙)] 3+ . Single-crystal X-ray diffraction shows that the Me 6 tren ligand restrains the metal centers in a trigonal bipyramidal geometry, and coordination of the bridging hydro- or semiquinone ligand results in a parallel alignment of the three-fold axes. We quantify the p -benzosemiquinone–transition metal magnetic exchange coupling for the first time and find that the nickel( ii ) complex exhibits a substantial J < −600 cm −1 , resulting in a well-isolated S = 3/2 ground state even as high as 300 K. The iron and cobalt complexes feature metal–semiquinone exchange constants of J = −144(1) and −252(2) cm −1 ,more »respectively, which are substantially larger in magnitude than those reported for related bis(bidentate) semiquinoid complexes. Finally, the semiquinone-bridged cobalt and nickel complexes exhibit field-induced slow magnetic relaxation, with relaxation barriers of U eff = 22 and 46 cm −1 , respectively. Remarkably, the Orbach relaxation observed for the Ni complex is in stark contrast to the fast processes that dominate relaxation in related mononuclear Ni II complexes, thus demonstrating that strong magnetic coupling can engender slow magnetic relaxation.« less
  4. Diamine-appended variants of the metal–organic framework M2(dobpdc) (M = Mg, Mn, Fe, Co, Zn; dobpdc4– = 4,4′-dioxidobiphenyl-3,3′-dicarboxylate) exhibit exceptional CO2 capture properties owing to a unique cooperative adsorption mechanism, and thus hold promise for use in the development of energy- and cost-efficient CO2 separations. Understanding the nature of thermal transport in these materials is essential for such practical applications, however, as temperature rises resulting from exothermic CO2 uptake could potentially offset the energy savings offered by such cooperative adsorbents. Here, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are employed in investigating thermal transport in bare and e-2-appended Zn2(dobpdc) (e-2 = N-ethylethylenediamine), both with and without CO2 as a guest. In the absence of CO2, the appended diamines function to enhance thermal conductivity in the ab-plane of e-2–Zn2(dobpdc) relative to the bare framework, as a result of noncovalent interactions between adjacent diamines that provide additional heat transfer pathways across the pore channel. Upon introduction of CO2, the thermal conductivity along the pore channel (the c-axis) increases due to the cooperative formation of metal-bound ammonium carbamates, which serve to create additional heat transfer pathways. In contrast, the thermal conductivity of the bare framework remains unchanged in the presence of zinc-bound CO2 but decreases in themore »presence of additional adsorbed CO2.« less
  5. Abstract

    Co$$_{3}$$3Sn$$_{2}$$2S$$_{2}$$2is a ferromagnetic Weyl semimetal that has been the subject of intense scientific interest due to its large anomalous Hall effect. We show that the coupling of this material’s topological properties to its magnetic texture leads to a strongly exchange biased anomalous Hall effect. We argue that this is likely caused by the coexistence of ferromagnetism and geometric frustration intrinsic to the kagome network of magnetic ions, giving rise to spin-glass behavior and an exchange bias.