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  1. Unambiguous identification of the superconducting order parameter symmetry inSr2RuO4has remained elusive for more than a quarter century. While a chiral p-wave ground state analogue to superfluid3He-A was ruled out only very recently, other proposed triplet-pairing scenarios are still viable. Establishing the condensate magnetic susceptibility reveals a sharp distinction between even-parity (singlet) and odd-parity (triplet) pairing since the superconducting condensate is magnetically polarizable only in the latter case. Here field-dependent17O Knight shift measurements, being sensitive to the spin polarization, are compared to previously reported specific heat measurements for the purpose of distinguishing the condensate contribution from that due to quasiparticles. We conclude that the shift results can be accounted for entirely by the expected field-induced quasiparticle response. An upper bound for the condensate magnetic response of <10% of the normal state susceptibility is sufficient to exclude all purely odd-parity candidates.

  2. The CuO 2 antiferromagnetic insulator is transformed by hole-doping into an exotic quantum fluid usually referred to as the pseudogap (PG) phase. Its defining characteristic is a strong suppression of the electronic density-of-states D ( E ) for energies | E | < Δ * , where Δ * is the PG energy. Unanticipated broken-symmetry phases have been detected by a wide variety of techniques in the PG regime, most significantly a finite- Q density-wave (DW) state and a Q = 0 nematic (NE) state. Sublattice-phase-resolved imaging of electronic structure allows the doping and energy dependence of these distinct broken-symmetry states to be visualized simultaneously. Using this approach, we show that even though their reported ordering temperatures T DW and T NE are unrelated to each other, both the DW and NE states always exhibit their maximum spectral intensity at the same energy, and using independent measurements that this is the PG energy Δ * . Moreover, no new energy-gap opening coincides with the appearance of the DW state (which should theoretically open an energy gap on the Fermi surface), while the observed PG opening coincides with the appearance of the NE state (which should theoretically be incapable of openingmore »a Fermi-surface gap). We demonstrate how this perplexing phenomenology of thermal transitions and energy-gap opening at the breaking of two highly distinct symmetries may be understood as the natural consequence of a vestigial nematic state within the pseudogap phase of Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 .« less
  3. Although crystals of strongly correlated metals exhibit a diverse set of electronic ground states, few approaches exist for spatially modulating their properties. In this study, we demonstrate disorder-free control, on the micrometer scale, over the superconducting state in samples of the heavy-fermion superconductor CeIrIn 5 . We pattern crystals by focused ion beam milling to tailor the boundary conditions for the elastic deformation upon thermal contraction during cooling. The resulting nonuniform strain fields induce complex patterns of superconductivity, owing to the strong dependence of the transition temperature on the strength and direction of strain. These results showcase a generic approach to manipulating electronic order on micrometer length scales in strongly correlated matter without compromising the cleanliness, stoichiometry, or mean free path.