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  1. Outlier detection is critical in real world. Due to the existence of many outlier detection techniques which often return different results for the same data set, the users have to address the problem of determining which among these techniques is the best suited for their task and tune its parameters. This is particularly challenging in the unsupervised setting, where no labels are available for cross-validation needed for such method and parameter optimization. In this work, we propose AutoOD which uses the existing unsupervised detection techniques to automatically produce high quality outliers without any human tuning. AutoOD's fundamentally new strategy unifies the merits of unsupervised outlier detection and supervised classification within one integrated solution. It automatically tests a diverse set of unsupervised outlier detectors on a target data set, extracts useful signals from their combined detection results to reliably capture key differences between outliers and inliers. It then uses these signals to produce a "custom outlier classifier" to classify outliers, with its accuracy comparable to supervised outlier classification models trained with ground truth labels - without having access to the much needed labels. On a diverse set of benchmark outlier detection datasets, AutoOD consistently outperforms the best unsupervised outlier detector selected from hundreds of detectors. It also outperforms other tuning-free approaches from 12 to 97 points (out of 100) in the F-1 score. 
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  2. Anomaly detection is a critical task in applications like preventing financial fraud, system malfunctions, and cybersecurity attacks. While previous research has offered a plethora of anomaly detection algorithms, effective anomaly detection remains challenging for users due to the tedious manual tuning process. Currently, model developers must determine which of these numerous algorithms is best suited for their particular domain and then must tune many parameters by hand to make the chosen algorithm perform well. This demonstration showcases AutoOD, the first unsupervised self-tuning anomaly detection system which frees users from this tedious manual tuning process. AutoOD outperforms the best un-supervised anomaly detection methods it deploys, with its performance similar to those of supervised anomaly classification models, yet without requiring ground truth labels. Our easy-to-use visual interface allows users to gain insights into AutoOD's self-tuning process and explore the underlying patterns within their datasets. 
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  3. Cutting-edge machine learning techniques often require millions of labeled data objects to train a robust model. Because relying on humans to supply such a huge number of labels is rarely practical, automated methods for label generation are needed. Unfortunately, critical challenges in auto-labeling remain unsolved, including the following research questions: (1) which objects to ask humans to label, (2) how to automatically propagate labels to other objects, and (3) when to stop labeling. These three questions are not only each challenging in their own right, but they also correspond to tightly interdependent problems. Yet existing techniques provide at best isolated solutions to a subset of these challenges. In this work, we propose the first approach, called LANCET, that successfully addresses all three challenges in an integrated framework. LANCET is based on a theoretical foundation characterizing the properties that the labeled dataset must satisfy to train an effective prediction model, namely the Covariate-shift and the Continuity conditions. First, guided by the Covariate-shift condition, LANCET maps raw input data into a semantic feature space, where an unlabeled object is expected to share the same label with its near-by labeled neighbor. Next, guided by the Continuity condition, LANCET selects objects for labeling, aiming to ensure that unlabeled objects always have some sufficiently close labeled neighbors. These two strategies jointly maximize the accuracy of the automatically produced labels and the prediction accuracy of the machine learning models trained on these labels. Lastly, LANCET uses a distribution matching network to verify whether both the Covariate-shift and Continuity conditions hold, in which case it would be safe to terminate the labeling process. Our experiments on diverse public data sets demonstrate that LANCET consistently outperforms the state-of-the-art methods from Snuba to GOGGLES and other baselines by a large margin - up to 30 percentage points increase in accuracy. 
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  4. Similarity search is the basis for many data analytics techniques, including k-nearest neighbor classification and outlier detection. Similarity search over large data sets relies on i) a distance metric learned from input examples and ii) an index to speed up search based on the learned distance metric. In interactive systems, input to guide the learning of the distance metric may be provided over time. As this new input changes the learned distance metric, a naive approach would adopt the costly process of re-indexing all items after each metric change. In this paper, we propose the first solution, called OASIS, to instantaneously adapt the index to conform to a changing distance metric without this prohibitive re-indexing process. To achieve this, we prove that locality-sensitive hashing (LSH) provides an invariance property, meaning that an LSH index built on the original distance metric is equally effective at supporting similarity search using an updated distance metric as long as the transform matrix learned for the new distance metric satisfies certain properties. This observation allows OASIS to avoid recomputing the index from scratch in most cases. Further, for the rare cases when an adaption of the LSH index is shown to be necessary, we design an efficient incremental LSH update strategy that re-hashes only a small subset of the items in the index. In addition, we develop an efficient distance metric learning strategy that incrementally learns the new metric as inputs are received. Our experimental study using real world public datasets confirms the effectiveness of OASIS at improving the accuracy of various similarity search-based data analytics tasks by instantaneously adapting the distance metric and its associated index in tandem, while achieving an up to 3 orders of magnitude speedup over the state-of-art techniques. 
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