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Creators/Authors contains: "Majewicz Fey, A."

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  1. An important problem in designing human-robot systems is the integration of human intent and performance in the robotic control loop, especially in complex tasks. Bimanual coordination is a complex human behavior that is critical in many fine motor tasks, including robot-assisted surgery. To fully leverage the capabilities of the robot as an intelligent and assistive agent, online recognition of bimanual coordination could be important. Robotic assistance for a suturing task, for example, will be fundamentally different during phases when the suture is wrapped around the instrument (i.e., making a c- loop), than when the ends of the suture are pulled apart. In this study, we develop an online recognition method of bimanual coordination modes (i.e., the directions and symmetries of right and left hand movements) using geometric descriptors of hand motion. We (1) develop this framework based on ideal trajectories obtained during virtual 2D bimanual path following tasks performed by human subjects operating Geomagic Touch haptic devices, (2) test the offline recognition accuracy of bi- manual direction and symmetry from human subject movement trials, and (3) evalaute how the framework can be used to characterize 3D trajectories of the da Vinci Surgical System’s surgeon-side manipulators during bimanual surgical training tasks.more »In the human subject trials, our geometric bimanual movement classification accuracy was 92.3% for movement direction (i.e., hands moving together, parallel, or away) and 86.0% for symmetry (e.g., mirror or point symmetry). We also show that this approach can be used for online classification of different bimanual coordination modes during needle transfer, making a C loop, and suture pulling gestures on the da Vinci system, with results matching the expected modes. Finally, we discuss how these online estimates are sensitive to task environment factors and surgeon expertise, and thus inspire future work that could leverage adaptive control strategies to enhance user skill during robot-assisted surgery.« less