skip to main content

Search for: All records

Creators/Authors contains: "Marshall, J."

Note: When clicking on a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) number, you will be taken to an external site maintained by the publisher. Some full text articles may not yet be available without a charge during the embargo (administrative interval).
What is a DOI Number?

Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.

  1. Free, publicly-accessible full text available November 1, 2022
  2. Abstract We present the results of an analysis of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) observations of the full 2500 deg 2 South Pole Telescope (SPT)-Sunyaev–Zel’dovich cluster sample. We describe a process for identifying active galactic nuclei (AGN) in brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) based on WISE mid-IR color and redshift. Applying this technique to the BCGs of the SPT-SZ sample, we calculate the AGN-hosting BCG fraction, which is defined as the fraction of BCGs hosting bright central AGNs over all possible BCGs. Assuming an evolving single-burst stellar population model, we find statistically significant evidence (>99.9%) for a mid-IR excess at highmore »redshift compared to low redshift, suggesting that the fraction of AGN-hosting BCGs increases with redshift over the range of 0 < z < 1.3. The best-fit redshift trend of the AGN-hosting BCG fraction has the form (1 + z ) 4.1±1.0 . These results are consistent with previous studies in galaxy clusters as well as as in field galaxies. One way to explain this result is that member galaxies at high redshift tend to have more cold gas. While BCGs in nearby galaxy clusters grow mostly by dry mergers with cluster members, leading to no increase in AGN activity, BCGs at high redshift could primarily merge with gas-rich satellites, providing fuel for feeding AGNs. If this observed increase in AGN activity is linked to gas-rich mergers rather than ICM cooling, we would expect to see an increase in scatter in the P cav versus L cool relation at z > 1. Last, this work confirms that the runaway cooling phase, as predicted by the classical cooling-flow model, in the Phoenix cluster is extremely rare and most BCGs have low (relative to Eddington) black hole accretion rates.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available March 3, 2023
  3. Mantis shrimps (Stomatopoda) possess in common with other crustaceans, and with Hexapoda, specific neuroanatomical attributes of the protocerebrum, the most anterior part of the arthropod brain. These attributes include assemblages of interconnected centers called the central body complex and in the lateral protocerebra, situated in the eyestalks, paired mushroom bodies. The phenotypic homologues of these centers across Panarthropoda support the view that ancestral integrative circuits crucial to action selection and memory have persisted since the early Cambrian or late Ediacaran. However, the discovery of another prominent integrative neuropil in the stomatopod lateral protocerebrum raises the question whether it is uniquemore »to Stomatopoda or at least most developed in this lineage, which may have originated in the upper Ordovician or early Devonian. Here, we describe the neuroanatomical structure of this center, called the reniform body. Using confocal microscopy and classical silver staining, we demonstrate that the reniform body receives inputs from multiple sources, including the optic lobe's lobula. Although the mushroom body also receives projections from the lobula, it is entirely distinct from the reniform body, albeit connected to it by discrete tracts. We discuss the implications of their coexistence in Stomatopoda, the occurrence of the reniform body in another eumalacostracan lineage and what this may mean for our understanding of brain functionality in Pancrustacea.« less