skip to main content

Attention:

The NSF Public Access Repository (NSF-PAR) system and access will be unavailable from 5:00 PM ET until 11:00 PM ET on Friday, June 21 due to maintenance. We apologize for the inconvenience.


Search for: All records

Creators/Authors contains: "McLaughlin, M. A."

Note: When clicking on a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) number, you will be taken to an external site maintained by the publisher. Some full text articles may not yet be available without a charge during the embargo (administrative interval).
What is a DOI Number?

Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.

  1. ABSTRACT

    PSR J1641+8049 is a 2 ms black widow pulsar with the 2.2 h orbital period detected in the radio and γ-rays. We performed new phase-resolved multiband photometry of PSR J1641+8049 using the OSIRIS instrument at the Gran Telescopio Canarias. The obtained data were analysed together with the new radio-timing observations from the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME), the X-ray data from the Spectrum-RG/eROSITA all-sky survey, and all available optical photometric observations. An updated timing solution based on CHIME data is presented, which accounts for secular and periodic modulations in pulse dispersion. The system parameters obtained through the light-curve analysis, including the distance to the source 4.6–4.8 kpc and the orbital inclination 56–59 deg, are found to be consistent with previous studies. However, the optical flux of the source at the maximum brightness phase faded by a factor of ∼2 as compared to previous observations. Nevertheless, the face of the J1641+8049 companion remains one of the most heated (8000–9500 K) by a pulsar among the known black widow pulsars. We also report a new estimation on the pulsar proper motion of ≈2 mas yr−1, which yields a spin-down luminosity of ≈4.87 × 1034 erg s−1 and a corresponding heating efficiency of the companion by the pulsar of 0.3–0.7. The pulsar was not detected in X-rays implying its X-ray-luminosity was $\lesssim$3 × 1031 erg s−1 at the date of observations.

     
    more » « less
  2. Abstract

    Single-pulse studies are important to understand the pulsar emission mechanism and the noise floor in precision timing. We study total intensity and polarimetry properties of three bright millisecond pulsars – PSRs J1022+1001, J1713+0747, and B1855+09 – that have detectable single pulses at multiple frequencies. We report for the first time the detection of single pulses from PSRs J1022+1001 and J1713+0747 at 4.5 GHz. In addition, for those two pulsars, the fraction of linear polarization in the average profile is significantly reduced at 4.5 GHz, compared to 1.38 GHz, which could support the expected deviation from a dipolar field closer to the pulsar surface. There is a hint of orthogonal modes in the single pulses of PSR J1713+0747. More sensitive multifrequency observations may be useful to confirm these findings. The jitter noise contributions at 1.38 GHz, scaled to one hour, for PSRs J1022+1001, J1713+0747, and B1855+09 are ≈135, ≈45, and ≈60 ns, respectively and are consistent with previous studies. We also show that selective bright-pulse timing of PSR J1022+1001 yields improved root-mean-square residuals of ≈22 $\mu$s, which is a factor of ≈3 better than timing using single pulses alone.

     
    more » « less
  3. ABSTRACT

    PSR J1757−1854 is one of the most relativistic double neutron star binary systems known in our Galaxy, with an orbital period of $P_\text{b}=4.4\, \text{h}$ and an orbital eccentricity of e = 0.61. As such, it has promised to be an outstanding laboratory for conducting tests of relativistic gravity. We present the results of a 6-yr campaign with the 100-m Green Bank and 64-m Parkes radio telescopes, designed to capitalize on this potential. We identify secular changes in the profile morphology and polarization of PSR J1757−1854, confirming the presence of geodetic precession and allowing the constraint of viewing geometry solutions consistent with General Relativity. We also update PSR J1757−1854’s timing, including new constraints of the pulsar’s proper motion, post-Keplerian parameters, and component masses. We conclude that the radiative test of gravity provided by PSR J1757−1854 is fundamentally limited to a precision of 0.3 per cent due to the pulsar’s unknown distance. A search for pulsations from the companion neutron star is also described, with negative results. We provide an updated evaluation of the system’s evolutionary history, finding strong support for a large kick velocity of $w\ge 280\, \rm{km\,s}^{-1}$ following the second progenitor supernova. Finally, we reassess PSR J1757−1854’s potential to provide new relativistic tests of gravity. We conclude that a 3-σ constraint of the change in the projected semimajor axis ($\dot{x}$) associated with Lense–Thirring precession is expected no earlier than 2031. Meanwhile, we anticipate a 3-σ measurement of the relativistic orbital deformation parameter δθ as soon as 2026.

     
    more » « less
  4. Abstract

    We investigate the use of bright single pulses from the Crab pulsar to determine separately the dispersion measure (DM) for the Main Pulse and Interpulse components. We develop two approaches using cross-correlation functions (CCFs). The first method computes the CCF of the total intensity of each of the 64 frequency channels with a reference channel and converts the time lag of maximum correlation into a DM. The second method separately computes the CCF between every pair of channels for each individual bright pulse and extracts an average DM from the distribution of all channel-pair DMs. Both methods allow the determination of the DM with a relative uncertainty of better than 10−5and provide robust estimates for the uncertainty of the best-fit value. We find differences in DM between the Main Pulse, the Low Frequency Interpulse, and the High Frequency Interpulse using both methods in a frequency range from 4 to 6 GHz. Earlier observations of the High Frequency Interpulse carried out by Hankins et al. (2016) resulted in DMHFIP–DMMPof 0.010 ± 0.016 pc cm−3. Our results indicate a DMHFIP–DMMPof 0.0127 ± 0.0011 pc cm−3(with DMcompbeing the DM value of the respective emission component), confirming earlier results with an independent method. During our studies we also find a relation between the brightness of single pulses in the High Frequency Interpulse and their DM. We also discuss the application of the developed methods on the identification of substructures in the case of Fast Radio Bursts.

     
    more » « less
  5. Abstract

    We present timing solutions for 21 pulsars discovered in 350 MHz surveys using the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). All were discovered in the Green Bank North Celestial Cap pulsar survey, with the exception of PSR J0957−0619, which was found in the GBT 350 MHz Drift-scan pulsar survey. The majority of our timing observations were made with the GBT at 820 MHz. With a spin period of 37 ms and a 528 days orbit, PSR J0032+6946 joins a small group of five other mildly recycled wide binary pulsars, for which the duration of recycling through accretion is limited by the length of the companion’s giant phase. PSRs J0141+6303 and J1327+3423 are new disrupted recycled pulsars. We incorporate Arecibo observations from the NANOGrav pulsar timing array into our analysis of the latter. We also observed PSR J1327+3423 with the Long Wavelength Array, and our data suggest a frequency-dependent dispersion measure. PSR J0957−0619 was discovered as a rotating radio transient, but is a nulling pulsar at 820 MHz. PSR J1239+3239 is a new millisecond pulsar (MSP) in a 4 days orbit with a low-mass companion. Four of our pulsars already have published timing solutions, which we update in this work: the recycled wide binary PSR J0214+5222, the noneclipsing black widow PSR J0636+5128, the disrupted recycled pulsar J1434+7257, and the eclipsing binary MSP J1816+4510, which is in an 8.7 hr orbit with a redback-mass companion.

     
    more » « less
  6. ABSTRACT We conducted a drift-scan observation campaign using the 305-m Arecibo telescope in 2020 January and March when the observatory was temporarily closed during the intense earthquakes and the initial outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, respectively. The primary objective of the survey was to search for fast radio transients, including fast radio bursts (FRBs) and rotating radio transients (RRATs). We used the seven-beam ALFA receiver to observe different sections of the sky within the declination region ∼(10°–20°) on 23 nights and collected 160 h of data in total. We searched our data for single-pulse transients, of covering up to a maximum dispersion measure of 11 000 pc cm−3 at which the dispersion delay across the entire bandwidth is equal to the 13-s transit length of our observations. The analysis produced more than 18 million candidates. Machine learning techniques sorted the radio frequency interference and possibly astrophysical candidates, allowing us to visually inspect and confirm the candidate transients. We found no evidence for new astrophysical transients in our data. We also searched for emission from repeated transient signals, but found no evidence for such sources. We detected single pulses from two known pulsars in our observations and their measured flux densities are consistent with the expected values. Based on our observations and sensitivity, we estimated the upper limit for the FRB rate to be <2.8 × 105 sky−1 d−1 above a fluence of 0.16 Jy ms at 1.4 GHz, which is consistent with the rates from other telescopes and surveys. 
    more » « less
  7. Abstract

    We present timing solutions for 12 pulsars discovered in the Green Bank North Celestial Cap 350 MHz pulsar survey, including six millisecond pulsars (MSPs), a double neutron star (DNS) system, and a pulsar orbiting a massive white dwarf companion. Timing solutions presented here include 350 and 820 MHz Green Bank Telescope data from initial confirmation and follow-up, as well as a dedicated timing campaign spanning 1 ryr PSR J1122−3546 is an isolated MSP, PSRs J1221−0633 and J1317−0157 are MSPs in black widow systems and regularly exhibit eclipses, and PSRs J2022+2534 and J2039−3616 are MSPs that can be timed with high precision and have been included in pulsar timing array experiments seeking to detect low-frequency gravitational waves. PSRs J1221−0633 and J2039−3616 have Fermi Large Area Telescope gamma-ray counterparts and also exhibit significant gamma-ray pulsations. We measure proper motions for three of the MSPs in this sample and estimate their space velocities, which are typical compared to those of other MSPs. We have detected the advance of periastron for PSR J1018−1523 and therefore measure the total mass of the DNS system,mtot= 2.3 ± 0.3M. Long-term pulsar timing with data spanning more than 1 yr is critical for classifying recycled pulsars, carrying out detailed astrometry studies, and shedding light on the wealth of information in these systems post-discovery.

     
    more » « less
  8. ABSTRACT We report observed and derived timing parameters for three millisecond pulsars (MSPs) from observations collected with the Parkes 64-m telescope, Murriyang. The pulsars were found during reprocessing of archival survey data by Mickaliger et al. One of the new pulsars (PSR J1546–5925) has a spin period P = 7.8 ms and is isolated. The other two (PSR J0921–5202 with P = 9.7 ms and PSR J1146–6610 with P = 3.7 ms) are in binary systems around low-mass (${\gt}0.2\, {\rm M}_{\odot }$) companions. Their respective orbital periods are 38.2 and 62.8 d. While PSR J0921–5202 has a low orbital eccentricity e = 1.3 × 10−5, in keeping with many other Galactic MSPs, PSR J1146–6610 has a significantly larger eccentricity, e = 7.4 × 10−3. This makes it a likely member of a group of eccentric MSP–helium white dwarf binary systems in the Galactic disc whose formation is poorly understood. Two of the pulsars are co-located with previously unidentified point sources discovered with the Fermi satellite’s Large Area Telescope, but no γ-ray pulsations have been detected, likely due to their low spin-down powers. We also show that, particularly in terms of orbital diversity, the current sample of MSPs is far from complete and is subject to a number of selection biases. 
    more » « less