skip to main content


Search for: All records

Creators/Authors contains: "Muldoon, Sarah F."

Note: When clicking on a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) number, you will be taken to an external site maintained by the publisher. Some full text articles may not yet be available without a charge during the embargo (administrative interval).
What is a DOI Number?

Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.

  1. Abstract

    Dynamic community detection provides a coherent description of network clusters over time, allowing one to track the growth and death of communities as the network evolves. However, modularity maximization, a popular method for performing multilayer community detection, requires the specification of an appropriate null network as well as resolution and interlayer coupling parameters. Importantly, the ability of the algorithm to accurately detect community evolution is dependent on the choice of these parameters. In functional temporal networks, where evolving communities reflect changing functional relationships between network nodes, it is especially important that the detected communities reflect any state changes of the system. Here, we present analytical work suggesting that a uniform null network provides improved sensitivity to the detection of small evolving communities in temporal networks with positive edge weights bounded above by 1, such as certain types of correlation networks. We then propose a method for increasing the sensitivity of modularity maximization to state changes in nodal dynamics by modelling self-identity links between layers based on the self-similarity of the network nodes between layers. This method is more appropriate for functional temporal networks from both a modelling and mathematical perspective, as it incorporates the dynamic nature of network nodes. We motivate our method based on applications in neuroscience where network nodes represent neurons and functional edges represent similarity of firing patterns in time. We show that in simulated data sets of neuronal spike trains, updating interlayer links based on the firing properties of the neurons provides superior community detection of evolving network structure when groups of neurons change their firing properties over time. Finally, we apply our method to experimental calcium imaging data that monitors the spiking activity of hundreds of neurons to track the evolution of neuronal communities during a state change from the awake to anaesthetized state.

     
    more » « less