skip to main content

Search for: All records

Creators/Authors contains: "Ott, T."

Note: When clicking on a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) number, you will be taken to an external site maintained by the publisher. Some full text articles may not yet be available without a charge during the embargo (administrative interval).
What is a DOI Number?

Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.

  1. null (Ed.)
    The angular size of the broad line region (BLR) of the nearby active galactic nucleus NGC 3783 has been spatially resolved by recent observations with VLTI/GRAVITY. A reverberation mapping (RM) campaign has also recently obtained high quality light curves and measured the linear size of the BLR in a way that is complementary to the GRAVITY measurement. The size and kinematics of the BLR can be better constrained by a joint analysis that combines both GRAVITY and RM data. This, in turn, allows us to obtain the mass of the supermassive black hole in NGC 3783 with an accuracy thatmore »is about a factor of two better than that inferred from GRAVITY data alone. We derive M BH = 2.54 −0.72 +0.90 × 10 7 M ⊙ . Finally, and perhaps most notably, we are able to measure a geometric distance to NGC 3783 of 39.9 −11.9 +14.5 Mpc. We are able to test the robustness of the BLR-based geometric distance with measurements based on the Tully–Fisher relation and other indirect methods. We find the geometric distance is consistent with other methods within their scatter. We explore the potential of BLR-based geometric distances to directly constrain the Hubble constant, H 0 , and identify differential phase uncertainties as the current dominant limitation to the H 0 measurement precision for individual sources.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available October 1, 2022
  2. ABSTRACT Large-amplitude Sgr A* near-infrared (NIR) flares result from energy injection into electrons near the black hole event horizon. Astrometry data show continuous rotation of the emission region during bright flares, and corresponding rotation of the linear polarization angle. One broad class of physical flare models invokes magnetic reconnection. Here, we show that such a scenario can arise in a general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulation of a magnetically arrested disc. Saturation of magnetic flux triggers eruption events, where magnetically dominated plasma is expelled from near the horizon and forms a rotating, spiral structure. Dissipation occurs via reconnection at the interface ofmore »the magnetically dominated plasma and surrounding fluid. This dissipation is associated with large increases in NIR emission in models of Sgr A*, with durations and amplitudes consistent with the observed flares. Such events occur at roughly the time-scale to re-accumulate the magnetic flux from the inner accretion disc, ≃10 h for Sgr A*. We study NIR observables from one sample event to show that the emission morphology tracks the boundary of the magnetically dominated region. As the region rotates around the black hole, the NIR centroid and linear polarization angle both undergo continuous rotation, similar to the behaviour seen in Sgr A* flares.« less
  3. Using VLTI/GRAVITY and SINFONI data, we investigate the subparsec gas and dust structure around the nearby type 1 active galactic nucleus (AGN) hosted by NGC 3783. The K -band coverage of GRAVITY uniquely allows simultaneous analysis of the size and kinematics of the broad line region (BLR), the size and structure of the near-infrared(near-IR)-continuum-emitting hot dust, and the size of the coronal line region (CLR). We find the BLR, probed through broad Br γ emission, to be well described by a rotating, thick disc with a radial distribution of clouds peaking in the inner region. In our BLR model, themore »physical mean radius of 16 light-days is nearly twice the ten-day time-lag that would be measured, which closely matches the ten-day time-lag that has been measured by reverberation mapping. We measure a hot dust full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) size of 0.74 mas (0.14 pc) and further reconstruct an image of the hot dust, which reveals a faint (5% of the total flux) offset cloud that we interpret as an accreting or outflowing cloud heated by the central AGN. Finally, we directly measure the FWHM size of the nuclear CLR as traced by the [Ca  VIII ] and narrow Br γ line. We find a FWHM size of 2.2 mas (0.4 pc), fully in line with the expectation of the CLR located between the BLR and narrow line region. Combining all of these measurements together with larger scale near-IR integral field unit and mid-IR interferometry data, we are able to comprehensively map the structure and dynamics of gas and dust from 0.01 to 100 pc.« less
  4. We present new near-infrared VLTI/GRAVITY interferometric spectra that spatially resolve the broad Br γ emission line in the nucleus of the active galaxy IRAS 09149−6206. We use these data to measure the size of the broad line region (BLR) and estimate the mass of the central black hole. Using an improved phase calibration method that reduces the differential phase uncertainty to 0.05° per baseline across the spectrum, we detect a differential phase signal that reaches a maximum of ∼0.5° between the line and continuum. This represents an offset of ∼120  μ as (0.14 pc) between the BLR and the centroidmore »of the hot dust distribution traced by the 2.3 μ m continuum. The offset is well within the dust sublimation region, which matches the measured ∼0.6 mas (0.7 pc) diameter of the continuum. A clear velocity gradient, almost perpendicular to the offset, is traced by the reconstructed photocentres of the spectral channels of the Br γ line. We infer the radius of the BLR to be ∼65  μ as (0.075 pc), which is consistent with the radius–luminosity relation of nearby active galactic nuclei derived based on the time lag of the H β line from reverberation mapping campaigns. Our dynamical modelling indicates the black hole mass is ∼1 × 10 8   M ⊙ , which is a little below, but consistent with, the standard M BH – σ * relation.« less
  5. We present near-infrared interferometric data on the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068, obtained with the GRAVITY instrument on the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope Interferometer. The extensive baseline coverage from 5 to 60 M λ allowed us to reconstruct a continuum image of the nucleus with an unrivaled 0.2 pc resolution in the K -band. We find a thin ring-like structure of emission with a radius r  = 0.24 ± 0.03 pc, inclination i  = 70 ± 5°, position angle PA = −50 ± 4°, and h / r  <  0.14, which we associate with the dust sublimation region. The observed morphology is inconsistent with the expected signatures ofmore »a geometrically and optically thick torus. Instead, the infrared emission shows a striking resemblance to the 22 GHz maser disc, which suggests they share a common region of origin. The near-infrared spectral energy distribution indicates a bolometric luminosity of (0.4–4.7) × 10 45 erg s −1 , behind a large A K  ≈ 5.5 ( A V  ≈ 90) screen of extinction that also appears to contribute significantly to obscuring the broad line region.« less
  6. We use VLTI/GRAVITY near-infrared interferometry measurements of eight bright type 1 AGN to study the size and structure of hot dust that is heated by the central engine. We partially resolve each source, and report Gaussian full width at half-maximum sizes in the range 0.3−0.8 mas. In all but one object, we find no evidence for significant elongation or asymmetry (closure phases ≲1°). The narrow range of measured angular sizes is expected given the similar optical flux of our targets, and implies an increasing effective physical radius with bolometric luminosity, as found from previous reverberation and interferometry measurements. The measuredmore »sizes for Seyfert galaxies are systematically larger than for the two quasars in our sample when measured relative to the previously reported R  ∼  L 1/2 relationship, which is explained by emission at the sublimation radius. This could be evidence of an evolving near-infrared emission region structure as a function of central luminosity.« less