skip to main content


Search for: All records

Creators/Authors contains: "Papadimitriou, George"

Note: When clicking on a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) number, you will be taken to an external site maintained by the publisher. Some full text articles may not yet be available without a charge during the embargo (administrative interval).
What is a DOI Number?

Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.

  1. Free, publicly-accessible full text available April 24, 2024
  2. Free, publicly-accessible full text available May 20, 2024
  3. Free, publicly-accessible full text available May 1, 2024
  4. In this paper, we describe how we extended the Pegasus Workflow Management System to support edge-to-cloud workflows in an automated fashion. We discuss how Pegasus and HTCondor (its job scheduler) work together to enable this automation. We use HTCondor to form heterogeneous pools of compute resources and Pegasus to plan the workflow onto these resources and manage containers and data movement for executing workflows in hybrid edge-cloud environments. We then show how Pegasus can be used to evaluate the execution of workflows running on edge only, cloud only, and edge-cloud hybrid environments. Using the Chameleon Cloud testbed to set up and configure an edge-cloud environment, we use Pegasus to benchmark the executions of one synthetic workflow and two production workflows: CASA-Wind and the Ocean Observatories Initiative Orcasound workflow, all of which derive their data from edge devices. We present the performance impact on workflow runs of job and data placement strategies employed by Pegasus when configured to run in the above three execution environments. Results show that the synthetic workflow performs best in an edge only environment, while the CASA - Wind and Orcasound workflows see significant improvements in overall makespan when run in a cloud only environment. The results demonstrate that Pegasus can be used to automate edge-to-cloud science workflows and the workflow provenance data collection capabilities of the Pegasus monitoring daemon enable computer scientists to conduct edge-to-cloud research. 
    more » « less
  5. null (Ed.)
  6. Modern scientific workflows are data-driven and are often executed on distributed, heterogeneous, high-performance computing infrastructures. Anomalies and failures in the work- flow execution cause loss of scientific productivity and inefficient use of the infrastructure. Hence, detecting, diagnosing, and mitigating these anomalies are immensely important for reliable and performant scientific workflows. Since these workflows rely heavily on high-performance network transfers that require strict QoS constraints, accurately detecting anomalous network perfor- mance is crucial to ensure reliable and efficient workflow execu- tion. To address this challenge, we have developed X-FLASH, a network anomaly detection tool for faulty TCP workflow transfers. X-FLASH incorporates novel hyperparameter tuning and data mining approaches for improving the performance of the machine learning algorithms to accurately classify the anoma- lous TCP packets. X-FLASH leverages XGBoost as an ensemble model and couples XGBoost with a sequential optimizer, FLASH, borrowed from search-based Software Engineering to learn the optimal model parameters. X-FLASH found configurations that outperformed the existing approach up to 28%, 29%, and 40% relatively for F-measure, G-score, and recall in less than 30 evaluations. From (1) large improvement and (2) simple tuning, we recommend future research to have additional tuning study as a new standard, at least in the area of scientific workflow anomaly detection. 
    more » « less