skip to main content


Search for: All records

Creators/Authors contains: "Raives, Matthias J."

Note: When clicking on a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) number, you will be taken to an external site maintained by the publisher. Some full text articles may not yet be available without a charge during the embargo (administrative interval).
What is a DOI Number?

Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.

  1. ABSTRACT

    We consider the general problem of a Parker-type non-relativistic isothermal wind from a rotating and magnetic star. Using the magnetohydrodynamics code athena++, we construct an array of simulations in the stellar rotation rate Ω* and the isothermal sound speed cT, and calculate the mass, angular momentum, and energy loss rates across this parameter space. We also briefly consider the 3D case, with misaligned magnetic and rotation axes. We discuss applications of our results to the spin-down of normal stars, highly irradiated exoplanets, and to nascent highly magnetic and rapidly rotating neutron stars born in massive star core-collapse.

     
    more » « less
  2. ABSTRACT

    Rapidly rotating magnetars have been associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and superluminous supernovae (SLSNe). Using a suite of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations at fixed neutrino luminosity and a couple of evolutionary models with evolving neutrino luminosity and magnetar spin period, we show that magnetars are viable central engines for powering GRBs and SLSNe. We also present analytical estimates of the energy outflow rate from the proto-neutron star (PNS) as a function of polar magnetic field strength B0, PNS angular velocity Ω⋆, PNS radius R⋆, and mass outflow rate $\dot{M}$. We show that rapidly rotating magnetars with spin periods P⋆ ≲ 4 ms and polar magnetic field strength B0 ≳ 1015 G can release 1050 to 5 × 1051 erg of energy during the first ∼2 s of the cooling phase. Based on this result, it is plausible that sustained energy injection by magnetars through the relativistic wind phase can power GRBs. We also show that magnetars with moderate field strengths of B0 ≲ 5 × 1014 G do not release a large fraction of their rotational kinetic energy during the cooling phase and, hence, are not likely to power GRBs. Although we cannot simulate to times greater than ∼3–5 s after a supernova, we can hypothesize that moderate field strength magnetars can brighten the supernova light curves by releasing their rotational kinetic energy via magnetic dipole radiation on time-scales of days to weeks, since these do not expend most of their rotational kinetic energy during the early cooling phase.

     
    more » « less
  3. ABSTRACT

    In the seconds following their formation in core-collapse supernovae, ‘proto’-magnetars drive neutrino-heated magnetocentrifugal winds. Using a suite of two-dimensional axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we show that relatively slowly rotating magnetars with initial spin periods of P⋆0 = 50–500 ms spin down rapidly during the neutrino Kelvin–Helmholtz cooling epoch. These initial spin periods are representative of those inferred for normal Galactic pulsars, and much slower than those invoked for gamma-ray bursts and superluminous supernovae. Since the flow is non-relativistic at early times, and because the Alfvén radius is much larger than the proto-magnetar radius, spin-down is millions of times more efficient than the typically used dipole formula. Quasi-periodic plasmoid ejections from the closed zone enhance spin-down. For polar magnetic field strengths B0 ≳ 5 × 1014 G, the spin-down time-scale can be shorter than the Kelvin–Helmholtz time-scale. For B0 ≳ 1015 G, it is of the order of seconds in early phases. We compute the spin evolution for cooling proto-magnetars as a function of B0, P⋆0, and mass (M). Proto-magnetars born with B0 greater than $\simeq 1.3\times 10^{15}\, {\rm \, G}\, (P_{\star 0}/{400\, \rm \, ms})^{-1.4}(M/1.4\, {\rm M}_\odot)^{2.2}$ spin down to periods >1 s in just the first few seconds of evolution, well before the end of the cooling epoch and the onset of classic dipole spin-down. Spin-down is more efficient for lower M and for larger P⋆0. We discuss the implications for observed magnetars, including the discrepancy between their characteristic ages and supernova remnant ages. Finally, we speculate on the origin of 1E 161348−5055 in the remnant RCW 103, and the potential for other ultra-slowly rotating magnetars.

     
    more » « less