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  4. Formation and evolution of the basal layer in large landslides has important implications for processes that reduce frictional resistance to sliding. In this report, we show that zircon geochronology and tectonic provenance can be used to investigate the basal layer of the gigantic-scale Markagunt gravity slide of Utah, USA. Basal layer and clastic injectite samples have unique tectonic chronofacies that identify the rock units that were broken down during emplacement. Our results show that basal material from sites on the former land surface is statistically indistinguishable and formed primarily by the breakdown of upper plate lithologies during sliding. Decapitated injectitesmore »have a different tectonic chronofacies than the local basal layer, with more abundant lower plate-derived zircons. This suggests clastic dikes formed earlier in the translation history from a structurally deeper portion of the slide surface and a compositionally different basal layer before being translated to their current position.« less
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  6. Artwork created by children can effectively communicate science content, especially for topics that are of universal concern for the public but may cause apprehension, like climate change. This commentary describes artwork from a youth art contest about climate change in which the winning art was displayed on public buses. Young artists learned about climate science while creating images that adults and youth easily engaged with in public spaces. Thus, we suggest that connecting youth with science through art, and then using youth-generated art to engage the general public in science learning can be an effective vehicle for science communication.
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