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  1. Abstract We present a new method for consistent, joint analysis of the pre- and post-reconstruction galaxy two-point functions of the BOSS survey. The post-reconstruction correlation function is used to accurately measure the distance-redshift relation and expansion history, while the pre-reconstruction power spectrum multipoles constrain the broad-band shape and the rate-of-growth of large-scale structure. Our technique uses Lagrangian perturbation theory to self-consistently work at the level of two-point functions, i.e. directly with the measured data, without approximating the constraints with summary statistics normalized by the drag scale. Combining galaxies across the full redshift range and both hemispheres we constrain Ω m  = 0.303 ± 0.0082, H 0  = 69.23 ± 0.77 and σ 8  = 0.733 ± 0.047 within the context of ΛCDM. These constraints are consistent both with the Planck primary CMB anisotropy data and recent cosmic shear surveys.
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available February 1, 2023
  2. Abstract We use luminous red galaxies selected from the imaging surveys that are being used for targeting by the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) in combination with CMB lensing maps from the Planck collaboration to probe the amplitude of large-scale structure over 0.4 ≤  z  ≤ 1. Our galaxy sample, with an angular number density of approximately 500 deg -2 over 18,000 sq.deg., is divided into 4 tomographic bins by photometric redshift and the redshift distributions are calibrated using spectroscopy from DESI. We fit the galaxy autospectra and galaxy-convergence cross-spectra using models based on cosmological perturbation theory, restricting to large scales that are expected to be well described by such models. Within the context of ΛCDM, combining all 4 samples and using priors on the background cosmology from supernova and baryon acoustic oscillation measurements, we find S 8  = σ 8 (Ω m /0.3) 0.5  = 0.73 ± 0.03. This result is lower than the prediction of the ΛCDM model conditioned on the Planck data. Our data prefer a slower growth of structure at low redshift than the model predictions, though at only modest significance.
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available February 1, 2023
  3. Abstract The Lyα forest provides one of the best means of mapping large-scale structure at high redshift, including our tightest constraint on the distance-redshift relation before cosmic noon. We describe how the large-scale correlations in the Lyα forest can be understood as an expansion in cumulants of the optical depth field, which itself can be related to the density field by a bias expansion. This provides a direct connection between the observable and the statistics of the matter fluctuations which can be computed in a systematic manner. We discuss the way in which complex, small-scale physics enters the predictions, the origin of the much-discussed velocity bias and the `renormalization' of the large-scale bias coefficients. Our calculations are within the context of perturbation theory, but we also make contact with earlier work using the peak-background split. Using the structure of the equations of motion we demonstrate, to all orders in perturbation theory, that the large-scale flux power spectrum becomes the linear spectrum times the square of a quadratic in the cosine of the angle to the line of sight. Unlike the case of galaxies, both the isotropic and anisotropic pieces receive contributions from small-scale physics.
  4. ABSTRACT We implement a model for the two-point statistics of biased tracers that combines dark matter dynamics from N-body simulations with an analytic Lagrangian bias expansion. Using Aemulus, a suite of N-body simulations built for emulation of cosmological observables, we emulate the cosmology dependence of these non-linear spectra from redshifts z = 0 to z = 2. We quantify the accuracy of our emulation procedure, which is sub-per cent at $k=1\, h \,{\rm Mpc}^{-1}$ for the redshifts probed by upcoming surveys and improves at higher redshifts. We demonstrate its ability to describe the statistics of complex tracer samples, including those with assembly bias and baryonic effects, reliably fitting the clustering and lensing statistics of such samples at redshift z ≃ 0.4 to scales of $k_{\rm max} \approx 0.6\, h\,\mathrm{Mpc}^{-1}$. We show that the emulator can be used for unbiased cosmological parameter inference in simulated joint clustering and galaxy–galaxy lensing analyses with data drawn from an independent N-body simulation. These results indicate that our emulator is a promising tool that can be readily applied to the analysis of current and upcoming data sets from galaxy surveys.
  5. Unidirectionally propagated electromagnetic waves are rare in nature but heavily sought after due to their potential applications in backscatter-free optical information processing setups. It was theoretically shown that the distinct bulk optical band topologies of a gyrotropic metal and an isotropic metal can enable topologically protected unidirectional surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) at their interface. Here, we experimentally identify such interfacial modes at terahertz frequencies. Launching the interfacial SPPs via a tailored grating coupler, the far-field spectroscopy data obtained reveals strongly nonreciprocal SPP dispersions that are highly consistent with the theoretical predictions. The directionality of the interfacial SPPs studied here is flexibly tunable by either varying the external field or adjusting the metallic characteristics of the bulk materials. The experimental realization of actively tunable unidirectional SPPs sets the foundation for developing nanophotonic information processing devices based on topologically protected interfacial waves.