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  1. Free, publicly-accessible full text available June 1, 2022
  2. Abstract

    In this work, we demonstrate that damage mechanism identification from acoustic emission (AE) signals generated in minicomposites with elastically similar constituents is possible. AE waveforms were generated by SiC/SiC ceramic matrix minicomposites (CMCs) loaded under uniaxial tension and recorded by four sensors (two models with each model placed at two ends). Signals were encoded with a modified partial power scheme and subsequently partitioned through spectral clustering. Matrix cracking and fiber failure were identified based on the frequency information contained in the AE event they produced, despite the similar constituent elastic properties of the matrix and fiber. Importantly, the resultantmore »identification of AE events closely followed CMC damage chronology, wherein early matrix cracking is later followed by fiber breaks, even though the approach is fully domain-knowledge agnostic. Additionally, the partitions were highly precise across both the model and location of the sensors, and the partitioning was repeatable. The presented approach is promising for CMCs and other composite systems with elastically similar constituents.

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  3. On Wikipedia, sophisticated algorithmic tools are used to assess the quality of edits and take corrective actions. However, algorithms can fail to solve the problems they were designed for if they conflict with the values of communities who use them. In this study, we take a Value-Sensitive Algorithm Design approach to understanding a community-created and -maintained machine learning-based algorithm called the Objective Revision Evaluation System (ORES)---a quality prediction system used in numerous Wikipedia applications and contexts. Five major values converged across stakeholder groups that ORES (and its dependent applications) should: (1) reduce the effort of community maintenance, (2) maintain humanmore »judgement as the final authority, (3) support differing peoples' differing workflows, (4) encourage positive engagement with diverse editor groups, and (5) establish trustworthiness of people and algorithms within the community. We reveal tensions between these values and discuss implications for future research to improve algorithms like ORES.« less
  4. Free, publicly-accessible full text available July 1, 2022