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  1. Experiments were carried out to observe the flow inside counterflow atomizers over a range of operating conditions and fluid properties. Liquids used were water and propylene glycol, while the gas was either air or helium. Liquid flow rates ranged from 10 ml/min to 40 ml/min, with gas liquid ratio (GLR) ranging from 0.1 to 0.6. The primary experiments used the 7-BM line of the Advanced Photon Source in Argonne National Laboratories with a 2.6 mm atomizer produced from (Poly)Ethyl-Ether-Ketone (PEEK). The X-Ray beam was operated in phase contrast mode, leading to interference patterns near the gas-liquid interface and enabling a qualitative understanding of the flow structure. Complementary optical work applied laser shadowgraphy to a 1 mm orifice atomizer constructed with quartz capillary tubing. A diffuse pulsed Nd:YAG laser backlight captured instantaneous gas-liquid interface positions in the internal flow. With both techniques, two distinct flow behaviors are observed corresponding to low and high GLR values. At low GLR, the inertia of the injected gas is insufficient to penetrate the liquid downflow. The gas stream entering the mixing chamber in the upstream direction is immediately deflected by the denser liquid and enters the discharge tube around a central liquid jet, which ismore »sheared and accelerated by the surrounding gas, leading to breakup. A distinct frequency of jet breakup is observed inside the discharge tube, with the liquid jet oscillating and fragmenting against the walls. The situation at high GLR is quite different, however, as the incoming gas stream asymmetrically penetrates upstream into the mixing chamber, taking the form of a high-speed jet confined along one wall, and displaying a flapping instability as it encounters the liquid flowing downstream. This flapping causes violent mixing, resulting in a highly disturbed interface, along with the generation of liquid ligaments and gas bubbles. This two-phase mixture enters the discharge tube with no liquid jet formation evident for this case. The transition between these two regimes is explored by changing the liquid viscosity and gas molar mass, and weak sensitivity to fluid properties is observed. Further, quantitative image analysis techniques applied to the low and high GLR cases allow extraction of the frequencies of the liquid jet in the discharge tube at low GLR, as well as the flapping mode at high GLR.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available May 25, 2023
  2. This study explores how to exploit a compute cache architecture to bring computation close to memory. Using a combination of experimental prototypes, benchmarking, and modeling & simulation, we perform architectural and application explorations of emerging/notional memory devices and compute cache architectures of the future to accelerate data analytics applications.
  3. This study explores how to exploit a compute cache architecture to bring computation close to memory. Using a combination of experimental prototypes, benchmarking, and modeling & simulation, we perform architectural and application explorations of emerging/notional memory devices and compute cache architectures of the future to accelerate data analytics applications.