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  1. Abstract We present a new method for consistent, joint analysis of the pre- and post-reconstruction galaxy two-point functions of the BOSS survey. The post-reconstruction correlation function is used to accurately measure the distance-redshift relation and expansion history, while the pre-reconstruction power spectrum multipoles constrain the broad-band shape and the rate-of-growth of large-scale structure. Our technique uses Lagrangian perturbation theory to self-consistently work at the level of two-point functions, i.e. directly with the measured data, without approximating the constraints with summary statistics normalized by the drag scale. Combining galaxies across the full redshift range and both hemispheres we constrain Ω m  = 0.303 ± 0.0082, H 0  = 69.23 ± 0.77 and σ 8  = 0.733 ± 0.047 within the context of ΛCDM. These constraints are consistent both with the Planck primary CMB anisotropy data and recent cosmic shear surveys. 
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  2. Abstract The Lyα forest provides one of the best means of mapping large-scale structure at high redshift, including our tightest constraint on the distance-redshift relation before cosmic noon. We describe how the large-scale correlations in the Lyα forest can be understood as an expansion in cumulants of the optical depth field, which itself can be related to the density field by a bias expansion. This provides a direct connection between the observable and the statistics of the matter fluctuations which can be computed in a systematic manner. We discuss the way in which complex, small-scale physics enters the predictions, the origin of the much-discussed velocity bias and the `renormalization' of the large-scale bias coefficients. Our calculations are within the context of perturbation theory, but we also make contact with earlier work using the peak-background split. Using the structure of the equations of motion we demonstrate, to all orders in perturbation theory, that the large-scale flux power spectrum becomes the linear spectrum times the square of a quadratic in the cosine of the angle to the line of sight. Unlike the case of galaxies, both the isotropic and anisotropic pieces receive contributions from small-scale physics. 
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