skip to main content


Search for: All records

Creators/Authors contains: "Wardetzky, Max"

Note: When clicking on a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) number, you will be taken to an external site maintained by the publisher. Some full text articles may not yet be available without a charge during the embargo (administrative interval).
What is a DOI Number?

Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.

  1. Free, publicly-accessible full text available December 15, 2024
  2. null (Ed.)
  3. Abstract

    We present a simple and concise discretization of the covariant derivative vector Dirichlet energy for triangle meshes in 3D using Crouzeix‐Raviart finite elements. The discretization is based on linear discontinuous Galerkin elements, and is simple to implement, without compromising on quality: there are two degrees of freedom for each mesh edge, and the sparse Dirichlet energy matrix can be constructed in a single pass over all triangles using a short formula that only depends on the edge lengths, reminiscent of the scalar cotangent Laplacian. Our vector Dirichlet energy discretization can be used in a variety of applications, such as the calculation of Killing fields, parallel transport of vectors, and smooth vector field design. Experiments suggest convergence and suitability for applications similar to other discretizations of the vector Dirichlet energy.

     
    more » « less
  4. The emerging field of discrete differential geometry (DDG) studies discrete analogues of smooth geometric objects, providing an essential link between analytical descriptions and computation. In recent years it has unearthed a rich variety of new perspectives on applied problems in computational anatomy/biology, computational mechanics, industrial design, computational architecture, and digital geometry processing at large. The basic philosophy of discrete differential geometry is that a discrete object like a polyhedron is not merely an approximation of a smooth one, but rather a differential geometric object in its own right. In contrast to traditional numerical analysis which focuses on eliminating approximation error in the limit of refinement (e.g., by taking smaller and smaller finite differences), DDG places an emphasis on the so-called “mimetic” viewpoint, where key properties of a system are preserved exactly, independent of how large or small the elements of a mesh might be. Just as algorithms for simulating mechanical systems might seek to exactly preserve physical invariants such as total energy or momentum, structure-preserving models of discrete geometry seek to exactly preserve global geometric invariants such as total curvature. More broadly, DDG focuses on the discretization of objects that do not naturally fall under the umbrella of traditional numerical analysis. This article provides an overview of some of the themes in DDG. 
    more » « less