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  1. null (Ed.)
    Abstract Background Cancer arises from an evolutionary process where somatic mutations give rise to clonal expansions. Reconstructing this evolutionary process is useful for treatment decision-making as well as understanding evolutionary patterns across patients and cancer types. In particular, classifying a tumor’s evolutionary process as either linear or branched and understanding what cancer types and which patients have each of these trajectories could provide useful insights for both clinicians and researchers. While comprehensive cancer phylogeny inference from single-cell DNA sequencing data is challenging due to limitations with current sequencing technology and the complexity of the resulting problem, current data might provide sufficient signal to accurately classify a tumor’s evolutionary history as either linear or branched. Results We introduce the Linear Perfect Phylogeny Flipping (LPPF) problem as a means of testing two alternative hypotheses for the pattern of evolution, which we prove to be NP-hard. We develop Phyolin, which uses constraint programming to solve the LPPF problem. Through both in silico experiments and real data application, we demonstrate the performance of our method, outperforming a competing machine learning approach. Conclusion Phyolin is an accurate, easy to use and fast method for classifying an evolutionary trajectory as linear or branched given a tumor’s single-cell DNA sequencing data. 
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  2. null (Ed.)
    Abstract Motivation While single-cell DNA sequencing (scDNA-seq) has enabled the study of intratumor heterogeneity at an unprecedented resolution, current technologies are error-prone and often result in doublets where two or more cells are mistaken for a single cell. Not only do doublets confound downstream analyses, but the increase in doublet rate is also a major bottleneck preventing higher throughput with current single-cell technologies. Although doublet detection and removal are standard practice in scRNA-seq data analysis, options for scDNA-seq data are limited. Current methods attempt to detect doublets while also performing complex downstream analyses tasks, leading to decreased efficiency and/or performance. Results We present doubletD, the first standalone method for detecting doublets in scDNA-seq data. Underlying our method is a simple maximum likelihood approach with a closed-form solution. We demonstrate the performance of doubletD on simulated data as well as real datasets, outperforming current methods for downstream analysis of scDNA-seq data that jointly infer doublets as well as standalone approaches for doublet detection in scRNA-seq data. Incorporating doubletD in scDNA-seq analysis pipelines will reduce complexity and lead to more accurate results. Availability and implementation https://github.com/elkebir-group/doubletD. Supplementary information Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. 
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  3. Nagarajan, Niranjan (Ed.)
  4. Kingsford, Carl ; Pisanti, Nadia (Ed.)