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  1. Extended depth of focus (EDOF) optics can enable lower complexity optical imaging systems when compared to active focusing solutions. With existing EDOF optics, however, it is difficult to achieve high resolution and high collection efficiency simultaneously. The subwavelength spacing of scatterers in a meta-optic enables the engineering of very steep phase gradients; thus, meta-optics can achieve both a large physical aperture and a high numerical aperture. Here, we demonstrate a fast(f/1.75)EDOF meta-optic operating at visible wavelengths, with an aperture of 2 mm and focal range from 3.5 mm to 14.5 mm (286 diopters to 69 diopters), which is a250×elongation of the depth of focus relative to a standard lens. Depth-independent performance is shown by imaging at a range of finite conjugates, with a minimum spatial resolution of9.84  μm(50.8 cycles/mm). We also demonstrate operation of a directly integrated EDOF meta-optic camera module to evaluate imaging at multiple object distances, a functionality which would otherwise require a varifocal lens.

     
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  2. Many emerging, high-speed, reconfigurable optical systems are limited by routing complexity when producing dynamic, two-dimensional (2D) electric fields. We propose a gradient-based inverse-designed, static phase-mask doublet to generate arbitrary 2D intensity wavefronts using a one-dimensional (1D) intensity spatial light modulator (SLM). We numerically simulate the capability of mapping each point in a 49 element 1D array to a distinct7×<#comment/>72D spatial distribution. Our proposed method will significantly relax the routing complexity of electrical control signals, possibly enabling high-speed, sub-wavelength 2D SLMs leveraging new materials and pixel architectures.

     
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