skip to main content

Search for: All records

Creators/Authors contains: "Williams, P."

Note: When clicking on a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) number, you will be taken to an external site maintained by the publisher. Some full text articles may not yet be available without a charge during the embargo (administrative interval).
What is a DOI Number?

Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.

  1. Secondary ion mass spectrometry techniques are used to study trace elements in organic samples where matrix compositions vary spatially. This study was conducted to develop calibrations for lithium content and lithium isotope measurements in kerogen. Known concentrations of Li ions (6Li and 7Li) were implanted into organic polymers, with a range of H/C and O/C ratios similar to kerogen, along with glassy carbon (SPI Glas‐22) and silicate glass (NIST SRM 612). Results show that Li content calibration factors (K*) are similar for carbonaceous samples when analysed using a 5kV secondary ion accelerating voltage. Using a 9 kV secondary ion acceleratingmore »voltage, K* factors are negatively correlated with the sample O content, changing ~ 30% between 0 and 15 oxygen atomic %. Thus, to avoid the matrix effect related to O content, using a 5 kV secondary ion accelerating voltage is best for quantification of Li contents based on 7Li+/12C+ ratios. Under these analytical conditions, Li ppm (atomic) = (132 (  8) × 7Li+/12C+) × 12C atom fraction of the sample measured. Lithium isotope ratio measurements of SPI Glas‐22 and NIST SRM 612 are within uncertainty; however, the organic polymer samples as a group show a 10‰ higher δ7Li than NIST SRM 612.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available June 1, 2023
  2. Abstract GW190814 was a compact object binary coalescence detected in gravitational waves by Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo that garnered exceptional community interest due to its excellent localization and the uncertain nature of the binary’s lighter-mass component (either the heaviest known neutron star, or the lightest known black hole). Despite extensive follow-up observations, no electromagnetic counterpart has been identified. Here, we present new radio observations of 75 galaxies within the localization volume at Δ t ≈ 35–266 days post-merger. Our observations cover ∼32% of the total stellar luminosity in the final localization volume and extend to later timescales than previouslymore »reported searches, allowing us to place the deepest constraints to date on the existence of a radio afterglow from a highly off-axis relativistic jet launched during the merger (assuming that the merger occurred within the observed area). For a viewing angle of ∼46° (the best-fit binary inclination derived from the gravitational wave signal) and assumed electron and magnetic field energy fractions of ϵ e = 0.1 and ϵ B = 0.01, we can rule out a typical short gamma-ray burst-like Gaussian jet with an opening angle of 15° and isotropic-equivalent kinetic energy 2 × 10 51 erg propagating into a constant-density medium n ≳ 0.1 cm −3 . These are the first limits resulting from a galaxy-targeted search for a radio counterpart to a gravitational wave event, and we discuss the challenges—and possible advantages—of applying similar search strategies to future events using current and upcoming radio facilities.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available December 1, 2022
  3. ABSTRACT The structure of the broad-line region (BLR) is an essential ingredient in the determination of active galactic nucleus (AGN) virial black hole masses, which in turn are important to study the role of black holes in galaxy evolution. Constraints on the BLR geometry and dynamics can be obtained from velocity-resolved studies using reverberation mapping data (i.e. monitoring data). However, monitoring data are observationally expensive and only available for a limited sample of AGNs, mostly confined to the local Universe. Here, we explore a new version of a Bayesian inference, physical model of the BLR that uses an individual spectrummore »and prior information on the BLR size from the radius–luminosity relation, to model the AGN BLR geometry and dynamics. We apply our model to a sample of 11 AGNs, which have been previously modelled using monitoring data. Our single-epoch BLR model is able to constrain some of the BLR parameters with inferred parameter values that agree within the uncertainties with those determined from the modelling of monitoring data. We find that our model is able to derive stronger constraints on the BLR for AGNs with broad emission lines that qualitatively have more substructure and more asymmetry, presumably as they contain more information to constrain the physical model. The performance of this model makes it a practical and cost-effective tool to determine some of the BLR properties of a large sample of low- and high-redshift AGNs, for which monitoring data are not available.« less
  4. We present six new time-delay measurements obtained from R c -band monitoring data acquired at the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics (MPIA) 2.2 m telescope at La Silla observatory between October 2016 and February 2020. The lensed quasars HE 0047−1756, WG 0214−2105, DES 0407−5006, 2M 1134−2103, PSJ 1606−2333, and DES 2325−5229 were observed almost daily at high signal-to-noise ratio to obtain high-quality light curves where we can record fast and small-amplitude variations of the quasars. We measured time delays between all pairs of multiple images with only one or two seasons of monitoring with the exception of the time delaysmore »relative to image D of PSJ 1606−2333. The most precise estimate was obtained for the delay between image A and image B of DES 0407−5006, where τ AB = −128.4 −3.8 +3.5 d (2.8% precision) including systematics due to extrinsic variability in the light curves. For HE 0047−1756, we combined our high-cadence data with measurements from decade-long light curves from previous COSMOGRAIL campaigns, and reach a precision of 0.9 d on the final measurement. The present work demonstrates the feasibility of measuring time delays in lensed quasars in only one or two seasons, provided high signal-to-noise ratio data are obtained at a cadence close to daily.« less