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    The Rogues Gallery is a new deployment for understanding next-generation hardware with a focus on unorthodox and uncommon technologies. This testbed project was initiated in 2017 in response to Rebooting Computing efforts and initiatives. The Gallery's focus is to acquire new and unique hardware (the rogues) from vendors, research labs, and start-ups and to make this hardware widely available to students, faculty, and industry collaborators within a managed data center environment. By exposing students and researchers to this set of unique hardware, we hope to foster cross-cutting discussions about hardware designs that will drive future performance improvements in computing long after the Moore's Law era of cheap transistors ends. We have defined an initial vision of the infrastructure and driving engineering challenges for such a testbed in a separate document, so here we present highlights of the first one to two years of post-Moore era research with the Rogues Gallery and give an indication of where we see future growth for this testbed and related efforts. 
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  3. The Emu Chick is a prototype system designed around the concept of migratory memory-side processing. Rather than transferring large amounts of data across power-hungry, high-latency interconnects, the Emu Chick moves lightweight thread contexts to near-memory cores before the beginning of each memory read. The current prototype hardware uses FPGAs to implement cache-less “Gossamer” cores for doing computational work and a stationary core to run basic operating system functions and migrate threads between nodes. In this initial characterization of the Emu Chick, we study the memory bandwidth characteristics of the system through benchmarks like STREAM, pointer chasing, and sparse matrix vector multiply. We compare the Emu Chick hardware to architectural simulation and Intel Xeon-based platforms. While it is difficult to accurately compare prototype hardware with existing systems, our initial evaluation demonstrates that the Emu Chick uses available memory bandwidth more efficiently than a more traditional, cache-based architecture. Moreover, the Emu Chick provides stable, predictable performance with 80% bandwidth utilization on a random-access pointer chasing benchmark with weak locality. 
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