skip to main content


Search for: All records

Creators/Authors contains: "Zhou, Shanglin"

Note: When clicking on a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) number, you will be taken to an external site maintained by the publisher. Some full text articles may not yet be available without a charge during the embargo (administrative interval).
What is a DOI Number?

Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.

  1. Free, publicly-accessible full text available July 9, 2024
  2. Gutkin, Boris S. (Ed.)
    Converging evidence suggests the brain encodes time in dynamic patterns of neural activity, including neural sequences, ramping activity, and complex dynamics. Most temporal tasks, however, require more than just encoding time, and can have distinct computational requirements including the need to exhibit temporal scaling, generalize to novel contexts, or robustness to noise. It is not known how neural circuits can encode time and satisfy distinct computational requirements, nor is it known whether similar patterns of neural activity at the population level can exhibit dramatically different computational or generalization properties. To begin to answer these questions, we trained RNNs on two timing tasks based on behavioral studies. The tasks had different input structures but required producing identically timed output patterns. Using a novel framework we quantified whether RNNs encoded two intervals using either of three different timing strategies: scaling, absolute, or stimulus-specific dynamics. We found that similar neural dynamic patterns at the level of single intervals, could exhibit fundamentally different properties, including, generalization, the connectivity structure of the trained networks, and the contribution of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Critically, depending on the task structure RNNs were better suited for generalization or robustness to noise. Further analysis revealed different connection patterns underlying the different regimes. Our results predict that apparently similar neural dynamic patterns at the population level (e.g., neural sequences) can exhibit fundamentally different computational properties in regards to their ability to generalize to novel stimuli and their robustness to noise—and that these differences are associated with differences in network connectivity and distinct contributions of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. We also predict that the task structure used in different experimental studies accounts for some of the experimentally observed variability in how networks encode time. 
    more » « less
  3. The large model size, high computational operations, and vulnerability against membership inference attack (MIA) have impeded deep learning or deep neural networks (DNNs) popularity, especially on mobile devices. To address the challenge, we envision that the weight pruning technique will help DNNs against MIA while reducing model storage and computational operation. In this work, we propose a pruning algorithm, and we show that the proposed algorithm can find a subnetwork that can prevent privacy leakage from MIA and achieves competitive accuracy with the original DNNs. We also verify our theoretical insights with experiments. Our experimental results illustrate that the attack accuracy using model compression is up to 13.6% and 10% lower than that of the baseline and Min-Max game, accordingly.

     
    more » « less
  4. null (Ed.)
  5. Free, publicly-accessible full text available January 1, 3033