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  1. Abstract The SuperCDMS SNOLAB dark matter search experiment aims to be sensitive to energy depositions down to 𝒪(1 eV). This imposes requirements on the resolution, signal efficiency, and noise rejection of the trigger system. To accomplish this, the SuperCDMS level-1 trigger system is implemented in an FPGA on a custom PCB. A time-domain optimal filter algorithm realized as a finite impulse response filter provides a baseline resolution of 0.38 times the standard deviation of the noise, σ n , and a 99.9% trigger efficiency for signal amplitudes of 1.1 σ n in typical noise conditions. Embedded in a modular architecture, flexible trigger logic enables reliable triggering and vetoing in a dead-time-free manner for a variety of purposes and run conditions. The trigger architecture and performance are detailed in this article.
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available July 1, 2023
  2. Abstract The field of dark matter detection is a highly visible and highly competitive one. In this paper, we propose recommendations for presenting dark matter direct detection results particularly suited for weak-scale dark matter searches, although we believe the spirit of the recommendations can apply more broadly to searches for other dark matter candidates, such as very light dark matter or axions. To translate experimental data into a final published result, direct detection collaborations must make a series of choices in their analysis, ranging from how to model astrophysical parameters to how to make statistical inferences based on observed data. While many collaborations follow a standard set of recommendations in some areas, for example the expected flux of dark matter particles (to a large degree based on a paper from Lewin and Smith in 1995), in other areas, particularly in statistical inference, they have taken different approaches, often from result to result by the same collaboration. We set out a number of recommendations on how to apply the now commonly used Profile Likelihood Ratio method to direct detection data. In addition, updated recommendations for the Standard Halo Model astrophysical parameters and relevant neutrino fluxes are provided. The authors of thismore »note include members of the DAMIC, DarkSide, DARWIN, DEAP, LZ, NEWS-G, PandaX, PICO, SBC, SENSEI, SuperCDMS, and XENON collaborations, and these collaborations provided input to the recommendations laid out here. Wide-spread adoption of these recommendations will make it easier to compare and combine future dark matter results.« less
  3. Abstract Understanding propagation of scintillation light is critical for maximizing the discovery potential of next-generation liquid xenon detectors that use dual-phase time projection chamber technology. This work describes a detailed optical simulation of the DARWIN detector implemented using Chroma, a GPU-based photon tracking framework. To evaluate the framework and to explore ways of maximizing efficiency and minimizing the time of light collection, we simulate several variations of the conventional detector design. Results of these selected studies are presented. More generally, we conclude that the approach used in this work allows one to investigate alternative designs faster and in more detail than using conventional Geant4 optical simulations, making it an attractive tool to guide the development of the ultimate liquid xenon observatory.
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available July 1, 2023
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