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  1. Abstract

    Acoustic metamaterials with negative constitutive parameters (modulus and/or mass density) have shown great potential in diverse applications ranging from sonic cloaking, abnormal refraction and superlensing, to noise canceling. In conventional acoustic metamaterials, the negative constitutive parameters are engineered via tailored structures with fixed geometries; therefore, the relationships between constitutive parameters and acoustic frequencies are typically fixed to form a 2D phase space once the structures are fabricated. Here, by means of a model system of magnetoactive lattice structures, stimuli‐responsive acoustic metamaterials are demonstrated to be able to extend the 2D phase space to 3D through rapidly and repeatedly switching signs of constitutive parameters with remote magnetic fields. It is shown for the first time that effective modulus can be reversibly switched between positive and negative within controlled frequency regimes through lattice buckling modulated by theoretically predicted magnetic fields. The magnetically triggered negative‐modulus and cavity‐induced negative density are integrated to achieve flexible switching between single‐negative and double‐negative. This strategy opens promising avenues for remote, rapid, and reversible modulation of acoustic transportation, refraction, imaging, and focusing in subwavelength regimes.

     
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  2. 3D architectures have been long harnessed to create lightweight yet strong cellular materials; however, the study regarding how 3D architectures facilitate the design of soft materials is at the incipient stage. Here, we demonstrate that 3D architectures can greatly facilitate the design of an intrinsically stretchable lattice conductor. We show that 3D architectures can be harnessed to enhance the overall stretchability of the soft conductors, reduce the effective density, enable resistive sensing of the large deformation of curved solids, and improve monitoring of a wastewater stream. Theoretical models are developed to understand the mechanical and conductive behaviors of the lattice conductor. We expect this type of lattice conductors can potentially inspire various designs of 3D-architected electronics for diverse applications from healthcare devices to soft robotics. 
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