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  1. The goal of compressed sensing is to estimate a high dimensional vector from an underdetermined system of noisy linear equations. In analogy to classical compressed sensing, here we assume a generative model as a prior, that is, we assume the vector is represented by a deep generative model G:Rk→Rn. Classical recovery approaches such as empirical risk minimization (ERM) are guaranteed to succeed when the measurement matrix is sub-Gaussian. However, when the measurement matrix and measurements are heavy-tailed or have outliers, recovery may fail dramatically. In this paper we propose an algorithm inspired by the Median-of-Means (MOM). Our algorithm guarantees recovery for heavy-tailed data, even in the presence of outliers. Theoretically, our results show our novel MOM-based algorithm enjoys the same sample complexity guarantees as ERM under sub-Gaussian assumptions. Our experiments validate both aspects of our claims: other algorithms are indeed fragile and fail under heavy-tailed and/or corrupted data, while our approach exhibits the predicted robustness.
  2. Linear encoding of sparse vectors is widely popular, but is commonly data-independent – missing any possible extra (but a priori unknown) structure beyond sparsity. In this paper we present a new method to learn linear encoders that adapt to data, while still performing well with the widely used l1 decoder. The convex l1 decoder prevents gradient propagation as needed in standard gradient-based training. Our method is based on the insight that unrolling the convex decoder into T projected subgradient steps can address this issue. Our method can be seen as a data-driven way to learn a compressed sensing measurement matrix. We compare the empirical performance of 10 algorithms over 6 sparse datasets (3 synthetic and 3 real). Our experiments show that there is indeed additional structure beyond sparsity in the real datasets; our method is able to discover it and exploit it to create excellent reconstructions with fewer measurements (by a factor of 1.1-3x) compared to the previous state-of-the-art methods. We illustrate an application of our method in learning label embeddings for extreme multi-label classification, and empirically show that our method is able to match or outperform the precision scores of SLEEC, which is one of the state-of-the-art embedding-based approaches.