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  1. ABSTRACT The Deep Synoptic Array 10-dish prototype (DSA-10) is an instrument designed to detect and localize fast radio bursts with arcsecond accuracy in real time. Deployed at Owens Valley Radio Observatory, it consists of ten 4.5-m diameter dishes, equipped with a 250-MHz bandwidth dual polarization receiver, centred at 1.4 GHz. The 20 input signals are digitized and field programmable gate arrays are used to transform the data to the frequency domain and transmit it over ethernet. A series of computer servers buffer both raw data samples and perform a real time search for fast radio bursts on the incoherent sum of all inputs. If a pulse is detected, the raw data surrounding the pulse are written to disc for coherent processing and imaging. The prototype system was operational from 2017 June to 2018 February conducting a drift scan search. Giant pulses from the Crab Pulsar were used to test the detection and imaging pipelines. The 10-dish prototype system was brought online again in 2019 March, and will gradually be replaced with the new DSA-110, a 110-dish system, over the next 2 yr to improve sensitivity and localization accuracy.
  2. Intense, millisecond-duration bursts of radio waves (named fast radio bursts) have been detected from beyond the Milky Way. Their dispersion measures—which are greater than would be expected if they had propagated only through the interstellar medium of the Milky Way—indicate extragalactic origins, and imply contributions from the intergalactic medium and perhaps from other galaxies. Although several theories exist regarding the sources of these fast radio bursts, their intensities, durations and temporal structures suggest coherent emission from highly magnetized plasma. Two of these bursts have been observed to repeat, and one repeater (FRB 121102) has been localized to the largest star-forming region of a dwarf galaxy at a cosmological redshift of 0.19. However, the host galaxies and distances of the hitherto non-repeating fast radio bursts are yet to be identified. Unlike repeating sources, these events must be observed with an interferometer that has sufficient spatial resolution for arcsecond localization at the time of discovery. Here we report the localization of a fast radio burst (FRB 190523) to a few-arcsecond region containing a single massive galaxy at a redshift of 0.66. This galaxy is different from the host of FRB 121102, as it is a thousand times more massive, with a specificmore »star-formation rate (the star-formation rate divided by the mass) a hundred times smaller.« less