skip to main content

Search for: All records

Editors contains: "Reed, B H"

Note: When clicking on a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) number, you will be taken to an external site maintained by the publisher. Some full text articles may not yet be available without a charge during the embargo (administrative interval).
What is a DOI Number?

Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.

  1. Reed, B H (Ed.)
    Abstract Protein components of the invertebrate occluding junction—known as the septate junction (SJ)—are required for morphogenetic developmental events during embryogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster. In order to determine whether SJ proteins are similarly required for morphogenesis during other developmental stages, we investigated the localization and requirement of four representative SJ proteins during oogenesis: Contactin, Macroglobulin complement-related, Neurexin IV, and Coracle. A number of morphogenetic processes occur during oogenesis, including egg elongation, formation of dorsal appendages, and border cell (BC) migration. We found that all four SJ proteins are expressed in egg chambers throughout oogenesis, with the highest and the most sustained levels in the follicular epithelium (FE). In the FE, SJ proteins localize along the lateral membrane during early and mid-oogenesis, but become enriched in an apical-lateral domain (the presumptive SJ) by stage 11. SJ protein relocalization requires the expression of other SJ proteins, as well as Rab5 and Rab11 like SJ biogenesis in the embryo. Knocking down the expression of these SJ proteins in follicle cells throughout oogenesis results in egg elongation defects and abnormal dorsal appendages. Similarly, reducing the expression of SJ genes in the BC cluster results in BC migration defects. Together, these results demonstrate an essential requirementmore »for SJ genes in morphogenesis during oogenesis, and suggest that SJ proteins may have conserved functions in epithelial morphogenesis across developmental stages.« less