skip to main content

Search for: All records

Editors contains: "de Vries, E."

Note: When clicking on a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) number, you will be taken to an external site maintained by the publisher. Some full text articles may not yet be available without a charge during the embargo (administrative interval).
What is a DOI Number?

Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.

  1. de Vries, E. (Ed.)
    Computer programming has been conceptualized as an expressive medium, but little is known about how to best support students in exercising agency and engagement in coding tasks. This paper draws on data from a five-day summer camp for middle school students that integrated computer science and movement. We focus on an activity in which students created choreography and modeled it in the programming environment NetLogo. The task was designed with the goal of creating opportunities for students to exercise agency and expressivity while coding. We analyze the extent to which incompatibilities, or moments of mismatch between what is possible in the dance versus NetLogo environments, shaped students’ agency and exploration. Our findings suggest that designing with incompatibilities positioned students with agency over their models and supported their own expressive goals.
  2. de Vries, E. (Ed.)
    Modeling is generally recognized as the core disciplinary practice of science. Through examinations of rich learning environments which expand the boundaries of modeling and the practices connected to it, researchers are broadening what modeling means in disciplinary settings. This interactive session brings together a diverse spectrum of scholars to share the practices they have used to expand modeling, how they were used in their curriculum, and the impact they had on learning. This session will serve as a rich opportunity for discussion to help advance the state of the field around what counts as modeling and the role it can play in learning.
  3. de Vries, E. (Ed.)
    This study investigates how the design of hybrid mathematics and computational activities influences the ways in which students leverage ideas from both disciplinary topics. We examine two design cycles of a computer programming summer camp for middle school students which foreground computational thinking and then mathematics alongside computational thinking respectively. We review the rationale for each design iteration, the trends we saw in students’ engagement, and the implications for students’ reasoning. Findings of this study demonstrate the importance of thinking critically about the boundary objects that are included in design that support students to make bridges between multiple disciplinary practices.
  4. de Vries, E. (Ed.)
    This symposium addresses dance as a site for STEM learning. We present papers from five research projects that each sought to engage youth in embodied STEM learning using dance, exploring the power of creative embodied experiences and the body’s potential as an expressive tool and resource for learning. We show how dance activities expanded access to STEM and supported sense-making; how dancer and dance-making practices were leveraged to support computational thinking, modeling, and inquiry; and how moving bodies in creative ways helped to generate new insights by allowing for new perspectives. Across our work, we seek to understand the multiple, rich learning opportunities that emerge from working across the arts and sciences, dance and STEM. Together our research shows that attending to opportunities for STEM engagement and learning through dance practices can broaden access to learning and engagement in STEM for all.
  5. de Vries, E. (Ed.)
    We articulate a framework for characterizing student learning trajectories as they progress through a scientific modeling curriculum. By maintaining coherence between modeling representations and leveraging key design principles including evidence-centered design, we develop mechanisms to evaluate student science and computational thinking (CT) proficiency as they transition from conceptual to computational modeling representations. We have analyzed pre-post assessments and learning artifacts from 99 6th grade students and present three contrasting vignettes to illustrate students’ learning trajectories as they work on their modeling tasks. Our analysis indicates pathways that support the transition and identify domain-specific support needs. Our findings will inform refinements to our curriculum and scaffolding of students to further support the integrated learning of science and CT.
  6. de Vries, E. (Ed.)
    We articulate a framework for characterizing student learning trajectories as they progress through a scientific modeling curriculum. By maintaining coherence between modeling representations and leveraging key design principles including evidence-centered design, we develop mechanisms to evaluate student science and computational thinking (CT) proficiency as they transition from conceptual to computational modeling representations. We have analyzed pre-post assessments and learning artifacts from 99 6th grade students and present three contrasting vignettes to illustrate students’ learning trajectories as they work on their modeling tasks. Our analysis indicates pathways that support the transition and identify domain-specific support needs. Our findings will inform refinements to our curriculum and scaffolding of students to further support the integrated learning of science and CT.
  7. de Vries, E. (Ed.)
    Historically, learning for young students has occurred in formal, in-person classroom environments. But in just a matter of weeks, children were mandated to transition to a completely new mode of learning, facing new learning challenges with heightened anxieties. To this end, we aim to better understand how our learning experience design (LXD) efforts support or hinder children’s engagement while participating in an online, video-based math course. This study operationalized LXD through the integration of e-learning instructional design (ID) as a lever for promoting students’ situational interest (SI), emphasis on human-centered design to support students’ user experience (UX), and the combination of SI and UX to foster student engagement in an online environment. Results provide practical implications for how we can intentionally iterate our designs to sustain children’s online engagement as we prepare for future instances of traditional, online and even hybrid models of instruction.
  8. de Vries, E. (Ed.)
  9. de Vries, E. (Ed.)
  10. de Vries, E. ; Hod, Y. (Ed.)
    This paper explores an episode of epistemic injustice that develops between two students with help from two teachers. Our analysis seeks to demonstrate not only that epistemic injustice has occurred, but also, how, and why it matters. In particular, we explore the idea of credibility deficit as helping to account for how and why one student’s contributions were routinely sidelined or ignored, and how that repeated positioning led to the ultimate act of testimonial injustice and its outcome, a wrong in the form of a loss of opportunity to learn.