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Title: Experimental demonstration of single electron transistors featuring SiO2 plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition in Ni-SiO2-Ni tunnel junctions
Award ID(s):
1207394
NSF-PAR ID:
10018263
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology A: Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films
Volume:
34
Issue:
1
ISSN:
0734-2101
Page Range / eLocation ID:
01A122
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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