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Title: Developing a Comprehensive Online Transfer Engineering Curriculum: Assessing the Effectiveness of an Online Engineering Graphics Course
Community colleges play an important role in educating future scientists and engineers, especially among students from groups that are traditionally underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Community college transfer programs offer lower-division courses that students can take in preparation for transfer to a four-year program. For many small community colleges, however, developing a comprehensive transfer engineering program that prepares students to be competitive for transfer can be challenging due to a lack of facilities, resources, and local expertise. As a result, engineering education becomes inaccessible to many community college students. Through a grant from the National Science Foundation Improving Undergraduate STEM Education program (NSF IUSE), three community colleges from Northern California collaborated to develop resources and teaching strategies to enable small-to-medium community college engineering programs to support a comprehensive set of lower-division engineering courses that are delivered either completely online, or with limited face-to-face interactions. This paper focuses on the development and testing of the teaching and learning resources for Engineering Graphics, which is a four-unit course (three units of lecture and one unit of lab) covering the principles of engineering drawings, computer-aided design (using both AutoCAD and SolidWorks), and the engineering design process. The paper also presents the more » results of the pilot implementation of the curriculum, as well as a comparison of the outcomes of the online course with those from a regular, face-to-face course. Student performance on labs and tests in the two parallel sections of the course are compared. Additionally student surveys and interviews, conducted in both the online and face-to-face course are used to document and compare students’ perceptions of their learning experience, the effectiveness of the course resources, their use of these resources, and their overall satisfaction with the course. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1430789
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10026372
Journal Name:
2016 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition
Volume:
2016
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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