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Title: Developing undergraduate teaching materials in collaboration with pre-university students
ABSTRACT In this project we have involved four high-achieving pre-university summer placement students in the development of undergraduate teaching materials, namely tutorial videos for first year undergraduate Electrical and Electronic Engineering lab, and computer simulations of didactic semiconductor structures for an Electrical Science first year compulsory taught module. Here we describe our approach and preliminary results.
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1663296
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10028121
Journal Name:
MRS Advances
Volume:
2
Issue:
31-32
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1713 to 1719
ISSN:
2059-8521
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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